The City of Tallahassee (2024)

FY17 Approved Budget

TABLE OF CONTENTS |ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW |FINANCIAL POLICIES |OPERATING BUDGET |CAPITAL BUDGET |FINANCIAL SCHEDULES |APPENDIX


Table of Contents

    • 0.1 Budget Message
  • 1.0 Organizational Overview
    • 1.1 Independent Peer Review
    • 1.2 Organizational Chart
    • 1.3
    • 1.4 Employment by Sector within Tallahassee
    • 1.5 Population
    • 1.6 Interesting Tallahassee Facts
    • 1.7 Property Tax Per $1,000
    • 1.8 Municipal Cost Comparison
  • 2.0 Financial Policies
    • 2.1 Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Calendar
    • 2.2 Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Process
    • 2.3 Finance Policy Summary
    • 2.4 Budget Statutes and Guidelines
  • 3.0 Operating Budget Overview
    • 3.1 Position Summary
    • 3.2 City Departments
    • 3.3 FY17 Funding for Outside Agencies
  • 4.0 Capital Budget Overview
    • 4.1 Capital Budget Process
    • 4.2 FY17 Department Capital Projects and Descriptions
    • 4.3 Five Year Capital Improvement Plan Budget
    • 4.4 Schedule of Debt Service
    • 4.5 FY17 Debt Policy Analysis
    • 4.6 Browse FY17 Capital Projects
  • 5.0 Financial Schedules
    • 5.1 FY17 Schedule of All Fund Balance
    • 5.2 FY17 Summary of Revenue Expenditures by Fund
    • 5.3 FY17 Schedule of Fund Structure
    • 5.4 Five Year Fund Proformas
    • 5.5 View the Entire FY17 Approved Budget on OpenGov
  • 6.0 Appendix
    • 6.1 Definitions
    • 6.2 Commonly Used Abbreviation
    • 6.3 Capital Funding Source Descriptions
    • 6.4 Resolution

The City of Tallahassee (1)

0.1 Read the full Budget Message

Mayor and City Commissioners,

It is my pleasure to present for your consideration a balanced budget for fiscal year 2017 (FY17). The goal set forth was to develop a budget that reflects the priorities and values of the entire community while maintaining expenses at the current level and not increasing the millage rate. I’m proud to report that we were able to accomplish those objectives, while also decreasing both the overall budget and the total General Fund budget.

The Fiscal Year 2017 (FY17) General Fund budget totals $145.9 million, $3.2 million less than the FY16 budget.

Expenditures in the General Fund have been budgeted to remain level with FY16’s budget, with the reduction in total funding possible because of the re-organization, added efficiencies and a decrease in the number of full time positions. In the coming fiscal year, the savings from these changes will help offset any increases incurred, allowing total expenses to remain level.

By streamlining resources, the City continues to further enhance services, improve operations, and achieve economies of scale. For example, divisions within Public Works were merged into various utility departments to align similar functions, resulting in a reduction in administrative costs and streamlining the accounting functions related to billing of project work between the General Fund and these enterprise funds. Similarly, strategic planning and crew dispatch techniques are shortening response windows and more closely coordinating activities like street pavement cuts for water service and street patching by public infrastructure. Opportunities to enhance efficiencies were also identified within StarMetro that resulted in a savings of $1.26 million.

Overall, the total proposed City budget, including the General Fund and Enterprise Funds, totals $701.5 million.

Tallahassee is a unique municipality and one where residents enjoy a high quality of life. We operate 77 parks, a municipal utility, the airport, two golf courses and several local cemeteries. Fire services extend beyond jurisdictional lines, and many of our other offerings are used and enjoyed by people who reside outside the city limits. Despite nearly half of our area’s property being off the tax roll due to state-ownership or exemption, Tallahassee ranked among the lowest in Total Municipal Costs in the annual municipal cost comparison with 12 similar Florida cities. This means that our citizens pay less for city services than most other peer cities across the state. By continuing to refine our processes, I am confident that we will continue to be able to offer citizens high quality services at a low cost.

To ensure this budget was a true reflection of our community’s priorities, the City was aggressive in its efforts to enhance the budget planning process this year. Efforts included coordinating a peer review by professionals in the field of budgeting and open government. This review provided recommendations on the process, where improvements could be made and how it can be more transparent.

To increase transparency, the City introduced an online portal, providing citizens with direct access to the City’s financial information.

With a commitment to the Commission and to citizens, a strong focus was placed on participation and dialogue from City leaders and citizens, while being transparent and forthcoming with information throughout the process. Regular updates were provided to the Commission, and meetings were held with citizen groups and community stakeholders, all of which created new opportunities for discussions regarding different elements in the budget.

In addition to surveying residents online, a statistically valid phone survey was conducted as part of the planning process. It revealed that, overall, residents who live in Tallahassee are very happy with the quality of services provided, with 82 percent of respondents rating services as either “excellent” or “good.” Citizens overwhelmingly reported that their top priorities are safety and infrastructure/facilities maintenance.

The proposed budget reflects these priorities and allocates our limited resources in a way that will meet the expressed needs of the community.

In the face of crime in our community, citizens feel that it’s more important than ever to provide adequate resources for the Tallahassee Police Department. Residents expressed that it is the most important area in which to spend taxpayer dollars. The budget includes $55,069,707 dedicated to TPD. Police patrol will be fully staffed in FY17, and overtime will be reduced by $343,000. The five-year outlook for TPD includes grant funding for 15 additional police officers in FY18 and the reduction of 10 police positions in FY21 through attrition as grant funding for officers is reduced.

The fire services fees, which were approved by the City Commission in 2015, were designed to remain in effect through the end of FY20. The projections for FY17 show that the current fees will adequately fund the Tallahassee Fire Department, including adjustments to personnel costs in accordance with the collective bargaining agreements.

Street preservation and maintenance is a core function of local government, and feedback from residents indicates that it should be a main priority for the City of Tallahassee. Residents expressed that it is the second most important area in which to spend taxpayer dollars. To ensure that our roads are properly maintained, a focus has been placed on restoring funding for general government capital projects, with $5.9 million allotted for capital projects (roadway, sidewalk and traffic infrastructure) in FY17.

As the City faced budgetary constraints over the years, funding for general fund capital projects were reduced in order to balance the general fund budget. Based on citizen feedback and City Commission direction, the proposed budget being presented seeks to restore the funding of general government capital projects to an annual $5-7 million investment.

Staff is currently exploring opportunities to improve the traditional way that road maintenance needs have been addressed. The goal is to move from a “worst first” approach, which typically required the most costly treatments for repair, to a pavement assessment management system that will identify the right fix for the right road at the right time in an effort to extend the roadway life at a lower cost per unit.

Similar program planning is being initiated to develop a more organized and effective sidewalk maintenance program to ensure the posterity of our nearly 500 miles of sidewalks.

StarMetro, the City’s public transit service, provides fixed route, university, paratransit and community transportation services. On average, StarMetro provides 4 million trips annually. It is a key public service, providing transportation to many citizens who have no other option to access employment, training, healthcare, etc. As is common with most bus/transit systems nationwide, it is supported by the General Fund. This year’s proposed contribution is $1.3 million less than FY16. This reduction is a reflection of a concerted effort by staff to operate a more efficient system with the dissolution of the Venom Express, route restructuring, fuel and maintenance savings and elimination of positions. At the same time, efforts are being made to increase the frequency of stops during peak time, decrease wait times and improve connectivity to better serve customers.

The budget also includes funding for community organizations and partnerships, including $2 million toward the Community Human Services Partnership. This represents an increase of $596,792 toward ensuring that the City is funding agencies that provide critical services to some of Tallahassee’s most vulnerable residents and neighborhoods.

While the local economy has not fully recovered from the economic downturn, the City is in a position to move away from reliance on one-time revenue sources and other actions that were necessary during the recession. This budget begins to take a long-view for City services, setting the stage for how we provide services and allocate resources for the next 3-5 years.

Included in this five-year outlook are annual 2 percent raises for non-union employees to help the City retain and recruit top quality people. As is evidenced in this budget, City employees provide excellent services at a low cost to citizens, and they continue to overcome challenges without compromising the level or quality of service. General Fund divisions will be required to strategically reduce costs to offset the 2 percent increase in salaries for non-union employees and a 4.5 percent increase in healthcare costs.

Beginning in FY17, the five-year plan includes the restoration of governmental capital funding, starting with $5.9 million in FY17; increased support for public safety; and no additions in full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) for the stated time period.

Residents of Tallahassee enjoy an unmatched quality of life, and the vast majority is extremely satisfied with City services, as reported in the recent surveys. This is the result of leadership from the City Commission and the commitment of employees. This budget reflects the community’s desire to invest in public safety and infrastructure to meet our current needs and lay the groundwork for years to come.

Throughout the coming year, staff will continue to close out the City books quarterly and provide Commissioners with frequent budget reports in public meetings. Additional methods for receiving citizen feedback will be developed and implemented. It is our goal to ensure the overarching values of the majority of our citizens are reflected in the level and quality of services provided.

Respectfully submitted,
The City of Tallahassee (2)
Ricardo Fernandez
City Manager


1.0 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW

The City of Tallahassee (3)

The fiscal year 2017 budget reflects the priorities of the City Commission and the community by maintaining expenses at the current level, restoring funding for road and sidewalk repair and reducing taxes. Commissioners expressed a desire to focus on restoring funding for capital projects to adequate levels in FY17 and for the next five years. This is in line with the community’s expressed desire to support infrastructure and will ensure that roads and sidewalks are properly maintained and that necessary improvements can be done. Respondents in a recent citizen survey reported that infrastructure and roads were two of the top items that should be funded. To help foster a more business friendly environment, Commissioners approved the elimination of the business tax starting in FY18. According to The Greater Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce, Tallahassee would be the first city in Florida to eliminate the tax resulting in an approximate $2,000,000 tax reduction impacting more than 12,000 area businesses.

As part of the effort to enhance the City's budget process, local Florida government professionals in the field of budgeting and open government conducted a Peer Review of our City's budget process on February 12-13 of this year. The City Manager organized the evaluation to obtain feedback and recommendations on the current process, to determine where improvements can be made, and to ascertain how the overall process can be made more transparent. Results of the report have been presented to staff and the City Commission. The Office of Financial Management worked throughout FY16 to implement the recommendations of the Peer Review process and will continue to do so in FY17 and beyond.

1.1 Download the Independent Peer Review

After a series of budget workshops, updates, agendas and public hearings, the City Commissioners adopted the fiscal year 2017 (FY17) budget on September 28, 2016. The operating budget totals $700.6 million, of which $151.6 is in the general fund and the capital budget for FY17 totals $143.4 million. Additionally, in accordance with Florida Statute 200.065, Commissioners approved the FY17 millage rate, reducing it from 4.2000 to 4.1000 mills, which is nearly a million dollars in savings for commercial and residential property taxpayers. They also set the millage rate for the Downtown Improvement Authority at 1.000 mills.

1.2 Organizational Chart

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Download the Organizational Chart

1.3 Mission & Values

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The City of Tallahassee, through workshops, surveys and commission retreats has developed the following vision,mission, and target issues. These are used as the basis for the performance measurement process that eachdepartment has implemented. Over the coming year, the measures will be reviewed and evaluated to ensure they arealigned with the City of Tallahassee’s vision, mission, values, critical success factors, and target issues.

Vision Statement
Tallahassee, Florida, a city that remembers its pastwhile focusing on the future –a vibrant capital city: fostering a strongsense of community, cherishing our beautiful natural environment, and ensuring economic opportunities for all ourcitizens.

Mission
The mission of the City of Tallahassee is to provide excellent services and facilities to support a high quality of life forour community.

Organizational Values
We adopt these organizational values as our guiding principles. We intend to hold each other accountable to supportand demonstrate these values in our daily actions and decisions.

  • Customer service is our business
  • Demonstrate leadership and personal responsibility
  • Promote and support employee excellence
  • Practice teamwork

Critical Success Factors

  • Maintain financial stability and improve economic viability
  • Provide quality services responsive to customers
  • Enhance community and neighborhood vitality


1.4 Employment by Sector within Tallahassee

The City of Tallahassee (5)

1.5 Population

The City of Tallahassee (6)

1.6 Interesting Tallahassee Facts

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  • A median age of 26.2 ranks Tallahassee as the second youngest city in Florida.
  • Minorities account for 43% of the City’s population (35% African American) as compared to the state level of 24% minorities (16% African American).
  • The city owns and operates six utilities: an electric generation, transmission, and distribution system, a natural gas distribution system, a water production and distribution system, a sewage collection system, a solid waste and recycling collections system and a storm water/flood control facility.
  • In addition, other enterprise activities owned and operated by the City of Tallahassee include fire services, a regional airport, public transportation, cemetery, and a municipal golf course. The City owns and operates an additional non-enterprise golf course that is funded by the general fund.
  • The city is home to two state universities and a community college. Combined, public sector employment accounts for about 36% of the Tallahassee Metropolitan Statistical Area labor force and helps to keep unemployment rates below the state and national levels.

1.7 Property Tax Per $1,000

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WHAT IS A MILLAGE RATE?
The millage rate (also known as property tax) is the amount per $1,000 used to calculate taxes on property. Millage rates are most often found in personal property taxes, where the expressed millage rate is multiplied by the total taxable value of the property to arrive at the property taxes due.

TALLAHASSEE
4.1000

FT.LAUDERDALE
4.1193

GAINESVILLE
4.5079

LAKELAND
5.5644

WEST PALM BEACH
8.3465


1.8 Municipal Cost Comparison

When compared to eleven other Florida cities Tallahasseans pay less than average for municipal services. Strong leadership from our City Commission combined with dedicated, customer focused City employees provides for quality services delivered at a reasonable cost.

The Municipal Cost Comparison below shows the cost of service and the financial impact of municipal services to citizens. This Comparison tabulates the full slate of public services a typical household would pay each year. The comprehensive comparison includes seven categories representing Property Taxes, Utilities (Water, Sewer, Electric), Solid Waste, Storm Water, and Fire Service. It is based on the average home value by city, average utility usage, and the annual cost of storm water and fire fees.

The City of Tallahassee (7)

Overall, the comparison shows that the cost of the services is the second lowest in the State. This is good news for us as service providers and for everyone living in Tallahassee. Even with the second largest area to serve and second largest population, the City of Tallahassee has the second-lowest total municipal cost to its citizens, averaging $2,859 per year!

View the data behind the Municipal Cost Comparison

2.0 FINANCIAL POLICIES

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The City of Tallahassee (8)

2.1 Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Calendar

  • October 1, 2015 - Fiscal Year 2016 Begins
  • January 27, 2016 - First Quarter Budget Update
  • March 23, 2016 - Peer Review Recommendations
  • April 13, 2016 - Budget Plan Workshop
  • April 27, 2016 - Second Quarter Budget Update
  • May 11, 2016 - Budget Plan Workshop
  • June 1, 2016 - Preliminary Estimate of Taxable Values
  • June 20, 2016 - Budget Plan Workshop
  • July 13, 2016 - Third Quarter Budget Update
  • July 13, 2016 - Budget Plan Workshop
  • July 13, 2016 - City Commission Sets Tentative Millage Rate
  • September 14, 2016 - First Public Hearing on Millage Rate and Budget
  • September 24, 2016 - Budget Notice Published
  • September 28, 2016 - Final Budget Hearing on Millage Rate and Budget
  • October 1, 2016 - Fiscal Year 2017 Begins

2.2 Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Process

View Full FY17 Budget Process Document

The budget process is a formalized occurrence that involves collaboration and coordination among the respective city departments, Financial Management, the City Manager, the executive team, the City Commission, and the citizens of Tallahassee. The process results in annual operating and capital budgets and a five-year financial and capital improvement plan for the General Fund and Enterprise Funds.

Public Input

The public is encouraged to provide input anytime of the year using various methods, such as City Commission meetings, City Commission budget workshops and resident surveys. Two statutorily required public hearings on the budget are also held in September each year to solicit public input.

For FY17, City leadership identified transparency as a top priority in the budget process. To that end, Florida local government professionals in the field of budgeting and open government were invited to conduct a peer review of the City’s budget process. The objectives of the review were to provide recommendations related to the budget process, community engagement in the process and increased transparency of the budget process. The recommendations led to a number of improvements, including the City’s use of OpenGov, an online financial transparency tool.

Budget Review and Adoption

Departments are responsible for developing their respective budget requests with support from Financial Management.
Throughout the year, City Commission budget workshops are held to discuss policy issues and long term ramifications of budgetary decisions. The City Commission adopts a tentative millage rate for the assessment of ad valorem taxes in early July as required by state statutes. The final budget and the millage rate are adopted by resolution during the month of September, following two statutorily required public hearings.

Budget Structure

The FY17 budget plan was developed with a “hold the line” directive from the City Manager for all General Fund departments, StarMetro, and Internal Service Funds. Approved personnel cost increases, with the exception of those defined by collective bargaining agreements, are to be absorbed by the department over the course of the fiscal year through operational efficiencies. The City’s enterprise operations developed budget plans based on revenue estimates consistent with the most recent rates studies.

Budget Amendments

Budgetary control is maintained at the department level, with Financial Management providing support to departments in the administration of their budgets. In accordance with the city’s budget transfer policy, departmental budgets can be amended in various ways depending on the type of transfer being considered.

Any budgetary amendment that is within the department’s appropriated budget and within the same fund can be authorized by the City Manager. Transfers between departments that cross funds or increase appropriations are made at the request of the City Manager and must be approved by the City Commission.

Budgetary amendments between divisions and within the same fund within a department may be initiated at the discretion of the department head except for transfers affecting personnel services, allocated accounts, accounts for insurance, bad debt, taxes or grants, articles for resale, fuel accounts, debt service, or interfund transfers. Requests for amendments to the line item exceptions are reviewed by Financial Management and approved by the City Manager or respective appointed official for transfers affecting the offices of the City Attorney, City Auditor, or City Treasurer-Clerk.

Since the implementation of the PeopleSoft financial system, budgetary control has moved from the line item level to major budget category. With the exception of the line items identified above, departments may over-expend line items provided there are available balances in the respective major budget category.

Budget Basis

Currently, the budgets for general government operations (General, StarMetro and Golf Course Funds) are prepared on a modified accrual basis. This means that obligations of the city (i.e., outstanding purchase orders) are accounted for as expenditures, but revenues are recognized only when they are measurable and available. At year end, open encumbrances are reported as reservations of fund balance. The operating budget does not include expenses for depreciation.

The budgets for the city’s utilities (Electric and Underground) and other enterprise operations (Aviation, Building Inspection, Solid Waste, Fire, and Cemeteries) are budgeted on a full accrual basis. Not only are expenditures recognized when a commitment is made (e.g., through a purchase order) but revenues are also recognized when they are obligated to the city (i.e., water user fees are recognized as revenue when bills are produced).

Budget and accounting procedures are subject to modifications to comply with GASB 34.

2.3 Finance Policy Summary

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The City regulates the planning, management, and financing of general government and enterprise operations through established policy standards. These policies define the appropriate use of year-end surpluses, transfers to general government operations, and establish operating reserves for select funds. Additional reserves such as the deficiencies, fleet, and RR&I reserves are also governed by the City’s finance policies.

View full Finance Policy Summary

General Fund

General Government: aggregate revenues or expenditures in the General Fund plus transfers to StarMetro, CRTPA, and Golf Course funds, when required.

Surplus
Any remaining balance is first used to fund the Deficiencies Reserve until the target level is achieved. After fully funding the deficiencies fund, any remaining balance may be used to support the subsequent year’s operating budget, up to a maximum of 5% of general government operating expenditures, and to buy down debt-financed capital improvement projects.

General Fund Transfer
$5.0 million in new funding is budgeted to support projects in FY17; less than $1 million has been programmed from the Undesignated Balance for FY17 projects.

Operating Reserve
Up to 5% of year-end surpluses will be allocated to support subsequent year’s operating deficit.

Other
Fleet Reserve:
The FY17 contribution is $1.37 million.

RR&I:
Undesignated balance set at a maximum of 3% of general government capital projects.

Fire Services Fund

Surplus
Retained for fire operating and capital costs.

General Fund Transfer
No Transfer.

Operating Reserve
No Reserve.

Other
Not Applicable.

Gas Fund

Surplus
Designated to fully fund the operating reserve and thereafter to fund gas system capital projects.

General Fund Transfer
The transfer policy was changed in FY12 to 6.99% of a 3-year average of system revenues. The transfer is now based on CPI. The transfer for FY17 is $2.8 million.

Operating Reserve
Funded at 25% of the previous year’s General Fund transfer. Used to meet General Fund transfer, if required.

Other
RR&I:Transfer budgeted at a level equivalent to depreciation expense as provided in the applicable rate study.

Internal Service Funds

Surplus
Except for the Information Systems Services Fund, revenues for all funds are balanced against actual expenditures, resulting in zero surpluses.

General Fund Transfer
Not applicable. Excess balances from budgeted revenues are transferred to the original funding source at year-end.

Operating Reserve
No Reserve.

Other
Funding needed for large capital outlays in the Information Systems Services Fund may be accumulated over a period of time in its RR&I fund.

Electric Fund

Surplus
Operating fund balance after General Fund transfer minus bond reserves used to fully fund the operating reserve, with the balance designated for electric system capital projects.

General Fund Transfer
Starting in FY13 the transfer was fixed at $23.9 million and increased annually by CPI. The transfer for FY17 totals $29.1 million.

Operating Reserve
The operating reserve is comprised of four subcomponents, with the primary purpose aimed at providing working capital. The working capital component is targeted with having a balance of 60 to 90 days of operating expenses. The other three components are fuel risk management, emergency reserve and rate stabilization.

Other
RR&I:Transfer budgeted at a level equivalent to depreciation expense as provided in the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). Bond covenants for 1998 Energy System bonds require a transfer to RR&I but do not specify an amount.

Water Fund

Surplus
Designated to fully fund the operating reserve and thereafter to fund water system capital projects.

General Fund Transfer
Starting in FY12, the transfer is budgeted at 6.99% of a 3-year average of system revenues. The transfer for FY17 is $3.4 million.

Operating Reserve
Funded at 25% of the previous year’s General Fund transfer. Used to meet General Fund transfer, if required.

Other
RR&I:Transfer budgeted at a level equivalent to depreciation expense as provided in the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR).

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund

Surplus
Retained for cemetery operating and capital costs.

General Fund Transfer
No Transfer.

Operating Reserve
No Reserve.

Other
Not Applicable.

Sewer Fund

Surplus
Designated to fully fund the operating reserve and thereafter to fund sewer system capital projects.

General Fund Transfer
Starting in FY12, the transfer is budgeted at 6.99% of a 3-year average of system revenues. The FY17 transfer is $4.7 million.

Operating Reserve
Funded at 25% of the prior year’s General Fund. Used to meet General Fund transfer, if required.

Other
RR&I:Transfer budgeted at a level equivalent to depreciation expense as provided in the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR).

Stormwater Fund

Surplus
Retained for stormwater system capital projects.

General Fund Transfer
The transfer to the General Fund represents administrative cost sharing only.

Operating Reserve
No Reserve.

Other
RR&I:Maximum of 5% of capital projects funding sources, with a minimum level of 3%.

Aviation Fund

Surplus
Retained within fund and allocated according to airline use agreement.

General Fund Transfer
No transfer to General Fund. Full recovery of cost.

Operating Reserve
Minimum of 1/12th of operating and maintenance budget for Airport (less fuel for resale) designated for unanticipated non-recurring expenditures.

Other
RR&I:Not applicable.

Solid Waste

Surplus
Retained for rate stabilization reserve.

General Fund Transfer
Starting in FY12, the transfer is budgeted at 6.99% of a 3-year average of system revenues. The FY17 transfer is $1.8 million.

Operating Reserve
No Reserve.

Other
RR&I:Not applicable.


2.4 Budget Statutes and Guidelines

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There are a number of statutory requirements, internal policies, and other provisions that direct the development of the budget and its implementation throughout the year.

View full Statutes and Guidelines - FY17

STATE OF FLORIDA REQUIREMENTS

Florida Statutes, Chapter 166 – This statute authorizes municipalities to levy taxes, issue licenses, and set user fees to raise money necessary to conduct municipal government activities. This chapter also requires that local governments adopt a balanced budget. The tentative balanced budget must be posted on the municipality’s official website at least 2 days before the budget hearing, held pursuant to s. 200.065 or other law, to consider such budget. The final adopted balanced budget must be posted on the municipality’s official website within 30 days after adoption.

Florida Statutes, Chapter 200 – This statute establishes procedures for adoption of local government annual budgets and limits ad valorem taxes to 10 mills. This statute also requires that local governments appropriate a balanced budget in which anticipated revenues and expenses are equal. Failure to comply with the provisions of the statute could result in loss of state revenue sharing and/or ad valorem taxes.

Ad Valorem Taxes – The Property Appraiser provides an annual estimate of taxable property values for the preceding year. Based upon adopted millage rates, municipalities are required to budget 95% of the gross taxable value for operating purposes. The city typically budgets 97%. In FY 2004, the city’s millage rate increased from 3.2 mills to 3.7 mills. This was the first millage rate increase since FY 1991. As a result of property tax reform legislation enacted by the Florida Legislature, the millage rate in the FY 2008 approved budget was reduced to 3.1686 mills. Due to the passage of Amendment 1 on January 29, 2008, the city’s millage rate for FY 2009 was 3.2115 mills. In FY 2010, the City Commission voted to increase the millage rate to 3.7 mills. The FY 2016 approved budget included a millage increase from 3.7 mills to 4.2 mills. For FY17, the millage was reduced to 4.1 mills.

Florida Statutes, Chapter 202 – The Communication Services Tax consolidates a variety of taxes formerly imposed on telecommunication, cable, home satellite and related services. Opting for the highest rate allowable by law, 6.1%, the City of Tallahassee is required to forego permit fee charges for use of city right-of-way.

Community Redevelopment Agency, Florida Statutes Chapter 163, City of Tallahassee Ordinance 00-O-51 and 04-O-60 To encourage economic development, the City Commission established a Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and designated an initial district (Frenchtown) of approximately 1,400 acres for redevelopment. A second district (Downtown) was approved in June 2004. Each CRA district is entitled to 95% of the ad valorem tax increment generated within the district and the proceeds may be used only for improvements in the district.

Downtown Improvement Authority, Florida Statutes Chapter 71-935 – Established by a special act in 1971, the Downtown Improvement Authority may levy an additional ad valorem tax, not to exceed one mill, on properties within the district. Proceeds are used for improvements in the district and are administered by a separate Board of Directors.

INTERNAL POLICIES

Comprehensive Plan – The Tallahassee-Leon County 2010 Comprehensive Plan was originally adopted by ordinance in FY 1990 and is updated with biannual amendment cycles. The Plan includes capital improvements, transportation, historic preservation, utilities, recreation, and other elements which provide a framework for allocating budget resources. The Capital Projects Summary includes a listing of capital projects that address Comprehensive Plan initiatives by eliminating deficit levels of services or by maintaining existing levels of service.

Financing Policy, No. 224 Commission Policies – The financing policy establishes guidelines for distribution of year-end surpluses, transfers from the utilities to the General Fund, types and amounts of operating reserves, and funding for capital projects from undesignated fund balance year-end revenues. The policy also provides for full recovery of cost for enterprise funds, limits non-utility fee increases to a maximum of 20% per year unless otherwise approved by the City Commission; and allows discount fees for recreational programs for youth, seniors, and disabled citizens. The “Finance Policy Summary” chart shows the requirements of the policy as applied to each fund.

Risk Management Policy/Self-Insurance, No. 214 Commission Policies – This policy creates an internal service fund for payment of anticipated claims and judgments for coverage areas defined in the policy. In addition, a special Insurance Reserve Fund is established and funded to meet unanticipated losses from catastrophic events or claims in excess of the Risk Management Fund. This reserve is set at 150% of the average claims for the past five years or $3,000,000, whichever is greater.

Capital Project Management, No. 218 Commission Policies – This policy provides for preparation of an annual capital budget and for a five-year capital improvement plan. The policy also defines roles and responsibilities of city departments and management regarding contracts, supplemental appropriations, over expenditures, and project administration. The use of capital project overhead charges as an operating budget funding source also is established by this policy.

Local Option Sales Tax Management, No. 232 Commission Policies

– This policy establishes the authority to provide advance funding for local Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) projects for any project or phase of project included in the FDOT five-year work plan. It allows for advance funding without an agreement for repayment after conducting a public hearing. The policy also authorizes the use of short-term debt to cover cash flow shortages that may result from this practice.

Debt Management Policy, No. 238 Commission Policies

– The debt management policy, along with an analysis of the city’s compliance with the policy, is included in the capital budget summary and in the capital improvement plan. Section 104 of the City Charter also specifies that general obligation debt will not exceed 20% of the assessed taxable valuation. Florida Statutes require that general obligation bonds be approved by referendum. The city currently does not have any general obligation bonds.

Vehicle Replacement Reserves – Funding for replacement of vehicles is included on an annual basis in the capital budget. To fund the reserves, each department is charged in the operating budget for a proportionate share of these costs based on equipment usage.

OTHER PROVISIONS

Bond Covenants – Prior to 1998, provisions of Bond Resolutions required that a minimum of 5% of prior year gross revenues be budgeted annually for Renewals, Replacements, and Improvements (RR&I) for system improvements in the utility enterprises. Covenants for the Energy System (electric and gas) bonds that were issued after 1998 do not specify an explicit amount or methodology but require a transfer to an RR&I fund.

Union Agreements – Currently, unions represent 668 FTEs (authorized positions). A total of 385 positions are subject to terms and conditions of the collective bargaining agreement with the Big Bend Chapter of the Florida Police Benevolent Association, Inc. and 283 positions are subject to terms and conditions of the collective bargaining agreement with the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF). The City Commission and police officers re-opened a new agreement, which was resolved April, 2015. The agreement was retroactively commenced on October 1, 2014 and extended through September 30, 2017. The IAFF ratified a new agreement on collective bargaining contracts for the existing firefighter unit (firefighters, fire engineers, and fire lieutenants) and the supervisory unit (battalion chiefs and captains) on January 8, 2015 and the City Commission approved it on January 14, 2015. The agreement was retroactively commenced on October 1, 2014 and extended through September 30, 2017.

Utility Rate Studies – Rate studies are prepared for each of the utility enterprise operations (electric and underground utilities). Revenue projections are prepared using historical weather patterns as well as other growth factors. These studies comprise the basis for the annual budgets for each of the utilities. Starting in October 2012, Water, and Sewer Utility rates increase annually by the CPI. This CPI increase methodology is the same for Electric, Natural Gas and Solid Waste rates. In January of 2016, electric, natural gas and solid waste rates were reduced for all customers. In October of 2016, electric and natural gas rates were reduced further and remain below the state average.

Assessment and Fee Reviews – Fees and assessments are periodically reviewed to ensure recovery of costs to provide certain services. A cost of services study for the animal shelter was conducted in 2006, which recommended a plan to recover at least 50% of the operating costs through animal licensing fees, but this has not been implemented. The City Commission also increased building inspection fees in August 2009 to fully recover all eligible building inspection costs. Rates for electric, underground utilities and solid waste are set by ordinances which provide for annual increase based on the CPI. Updated Fire services fee were implemented on October 1, 2015.

3.0 OPERATING BUDGET OVERVIEW

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The City of Tallahassee (9)

In January 2016, the City Manager implemented a re-organization plan that eliminated 10 positions, none of which impacted Community Engagement and Public Safety. The City’s total workforce reduced from 2,874.50 to 2,864.50 full-time equivalents (FTE’s). Over the last year, the City has increased the number of positions in Public Safety in order to address significant needs for community services. To meet the priorities of the City Commission, departments were reorganized to increase efficiency and effectiveness. Service areas have been redefined and divisions consolidated based on similar functions resulting in less redundancy while augmenting planning and coordination. Leading to areas requiring internal and external service reporting directly to the City Manager divisions were merged so that we can better serve our citizens.

As such, general funded departments committed to meeting the fiscal year 2016 budget plan with, the FY16 general fund budget being the FY17 target for general fund operations. As management efforts are accomplished and savings are realized, budget plans were discussed for areas that require a higher priority of funding (ex. public infrastructure capital projects). The City is streamlining resources to enhance and improve the effectiveness of all operations. In January 2016, divisions within Public Works were merged into other departments to align similar functions to better serve citizens. In the FY 2017 budget plan, specific Public Infrastructure (PI) divisions were transferred from the general fund into the respective enterprise fund in order to immediately reduce the amount of administrative effort spent calculating and reconciling internal billing of project work between the General Fund and these enterprise funds. These position, operating savings, and subsequent adjustments for staffing assignments in the re-organization are reflected in the FY16 and FY17 budget. As departments continue to re-assess the organization needs, additional savings and adjustments in operations are expected. These changes reflect the ongoing effort to provide and support critical services, and to streamline the organization to both mission-effective as well as cost-effective simultaneously.

3.1 Position Summary

View full FY17 Approved Position Summary

FY17 Approved Position Summary

Department

FY 2016 Adopted FTE's

FY17 Approved FTE's

Net Change (FY16 vs. FY17)

City Commission/Office of the Mayor

13.00

13.00

0.00

City Attorney

21.00

21.00

0.00

Treasurer-Clerk

56.50

56.50

0.00

Auditing

7.00

7.00

0.00

Executive Services (Closed)

36.00

0.00

(36.00)

Executive Services (New)

0.00

25.00

25.00

Technology and Innovations (New)

0.00

99.50

99.50

Human Resources & Workforce Development (New)

0.00

35.00

35.00

Fire

296.00

297.00

1.00

Police

466.00

466.00

0.00

Public Works (Closed)

286.00

0.00

(286.00)

Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Affairs

173.25

173.25

0.00

Planning

26.00

27.00

1.00

Community Housing and Human Services (FKA Economic & Community Development)

36.00

20.00

(16.00)

Aviation

55.00

55.00

0.00

StarMetro

148.00

141.00

(7.00)

Electric Utility

303.00

336.00

33.00

Growth Management

62.00

80.00

17.00

Community Beautification & Waste Mgmt (FKA Solid Waste)

83.00

148.00

65.00

Real Estate Management (New)

0.00

11.00

11.00

Customer Services (FKA Utility Services)

148.00

135.00

(13.00)

Communications

14.00

8.00

(6.00)

Community Relations (FKA Customer Services)

1.00

17.00

16.00

Administration & Professional Services (FKA Management & Administration)

184.00

61.50

(122.50)

Fleet Management

80.00

82.00

2.00

Underground Utilities & Public Infrastructure (FKA Underground Utilities)

362.00

531.00

169.00

Emergency Preparedness & Facilities Security (FKA Emergency Management)

1.00

5.00

4.00

Environmental Services & Facilities Management (FKA Environ. Policy & Energy Resources)

14.00

12.00

(2.00)

Ethics Office

1.75

1.75

0.00

Total

2,874.50

2,864.50

(10.00)

Eliminated Positions

The following ten (10) positions were eliminated as a part of the FY16 reorganization implemented in January 2016:

  • Administrative Service Manager (Public Works)
  • Director-Public Works (Public Works)
  • Manager-Public Works Operations (Public Works)
  • Asst. Dir-Economic & Community Development (Economic and Community Development)
  • Superintendent-Transit Maintenance (StarMetro)
  • Transportation Finance Administrator (StarMetro)
  • Administrative Supervisor (Utility Services)
  • General Manager-Utility Services (Utility Services)
  • Dir-Environ Policy & Energy Resources (Environmental Policy & Energy Services)
  • Administrative Services Manager (Environmental Policy & Energy Services)

3.2 City Departments

The City of Tallahassee is comprised of 27 departments.

Download all Department Descriptions

City Department Descriptions

City Commission/Office of the Mayor

The Mayor and City Commission serve as the governing body of the City; they set policies and rules by which the City is operated, including establishing City goals and target issues, as well as setting City tax rates.

City Attorney

The City Attorney's Office provides legal counsel and representation to the Tallahassee City Commission, City Manager, city departments, and city-appointed boards and commissions in any suit, action or proceeding filed by or against them.

Treasurer-Clerk

The mission of the Treasurer-Clerk’s Office consists of the following: through the development and application of sound financial management practices and policies, to place the City in the most advantageous and secure financial position possible; through well formulated and administered benefit design to provide City employees with the availability of sufficient and secure retirement; and, to provide city government and the residents of Tallahassee with quick and accurate access to all City records and actions.

Auditing

The mission of the Office is to provide the City Commission an independent, objective, and comprehensive auditing program of City operations; advance accountability through the provision of assurance and advisory services; and actively work with Appointed Officials in identifying risks, evaluating controls, and making recommendations that promote economical, efficient, and effective delivery of City services.

Executive Services

The Executive Services Department includes the City Manager's Office consisting of the City Manager, four Assistant City Managers and the Assistant to the City Manager. Each Assistant City Manager is responsible for several departments that have been aligned to compliment to the FY16 city-wide re-organization as follows: citizen services, community engagement and public safety, development services and economic vitality, and administration and professional services. This department is also responsible for maintenance and repairs of City Hall.

Technology and Innovation

Technology and Innovation (T&I) is responsible for innovating and providing computer, telecommunications and radio services for all city departments. The focus is only to provide city departments with the ability to more efficient and effective through the use of technology, but to provide citizen’s access to services and city information through the use of technology as well. Revenues are derived through the distribution of costs to user departments. The department now reports directly to the City Manager as a part of the FY16 re-organization.

Human Resources and Workforce Development

The Human Resources & Workforce Development Department is responsible for the development, implementation and administration of all systems, programs, policies and procedures, as well as managing and coordinating organizational initiatives that impact City employees.

Fire

The Tallahassee Fire Department (TFD) is charged with the responsibility of protecting lives, property, and the environment from hazardous conditions that threaten our community. This mission is accomplished through the provision of prevention and protective services specific to the incident need.

Police

Having maintained its accredited status for three decades, the Department strives every day to fulfill its mission statement: To continue the time-honored tradition of excellence in public service by protecting and enhancing the quality of life for our citizens.

Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Affairs

The Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Affairs Department provides recreational opportunities for the citizens of Tallahassee and Leon County, liaison assistance for neighborhood associations and operates the Animal Service Center.

PLACE (Planning, Land Management and Community Development)

The PLACE/Planning Department provides leadership to facilitate high quality growth and development in both the City of Tallahassee and Leon County.

Community Housing and Human Services

The City’s Community Housing and Human Services Department provides services to the Tallahassee community through community housing, human services, and historic property preservation programs.

Aviation

The Aviation Department operates the Tallahassee International Airport. The Aviation Department consists of six divisions: the Executive Division; Commercial Development Division; Finance and Administration Division; Facilities Management Division; Operations Division and Capital Programs Administration Division.

StarMetro

StarMetro, the transit system, for the City of Tallahassee, operates 12 weekday cross-town routes, as well as university routes for Florida State University (FSU) and Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University (FAMU). StarMetro also provides demand response (para-transit) transportation to senior, disabled and low-income customers in Tallahassee and Leon County.

Electric Utility

The Electric Utility serves over 116,000 customers in a 221 square mile service territory. It is the fourth largest municipality utility in Florida, and is the 25th largest of over 2,000 municipal systems in the United States. The utility is comprised of seven major divisions: Administration, Power Engineering, Power Production, System Compliance, System Integrated Planning, System Reliability and Transmission Services, and Transmission and Distribution.

Growth Management

The Growth Management Department facilitates well-designed, efficient, healthy, and safely built developments, while ensuring preservation of the natural and cultural environment. The Department promotes economic vitality and environmental sensitivity through coordinated plan review, permitting and inspection services.

Community Beautification and Waste Management

Community Beautification and Waste Management Services provides garbage, trash, and recycling services to 67,500 customers, 60,800 residential and 6,700 commercial. In addition, the department is responsible for maintaining 13,500 acres of medians and rights-of-ways along major roadways within the City.

Real Estate Management

Real Estate Management provides comprehensive real-estate services for all city departments and is responsible for the acquisition of all real estate for capital improvement projects such as roads, stormwater facilities, utilities such as electric, gas, water and sewer, management of City-owned parking facilities, Renaissance and Gemini office buildings as well as the management and disposition of surplus property, leases and maintenance of the City’s real estate inventory.

Customer Services

The Customer Services division provides utility services administration, utility customer field operations, wholesale energy services and golf programs.

Communications

The Communications Department serves to keep the public informed of City policies and actions. This department directs media relations, public information and engagement programs, digital communications including the city’s website and social media and marketing programs, emergency response and community preparation communications efforts, and promotion of City initiatives and services.

Community Relations

The Office of Community Relations provides community engagement and outreach to the citizens of Tallahassee. This is accomplished through public awareness about a variety of topics ranging from energy conservation to innovative programs and sustainability. OCR partners with neighborhood leaders, churches, civic groups, and other organizations to improve the quality of life for all Tallahasseans.

Administration and Professional Services

This department’s responsibilities include development and preparation of the annual operating and capital budgets and related financial policies, enacting operational functions, financial reporting, grant writing, organizing centralized procurement activities, promoting community outreach, regulating green city initiatives, and ensuring City facilities and operations achieve and maintain compliance with all new, proposed and existing federal, state and local environmental laws, rules, and regulations.

Fleet Management

Fleet Management facilitates the acquisition, disposal, maintenance, repair, fuel consumption needs, and historical data collection for all the city’s vehicles and construction equipment with the exception of StarMetro buses. The Fleet program is comprised of five divisions: administration, service, parts, motor pool, and garage unit.

Underground Utilities and Public Infrastructure

The Underground Utilities and Public Infrastructure provide the following services: public infrastructure, gas, water, sewer and stormwater management.

Emergency Preparedness and Facilities Security

The Emergency Preparedness and Facilities Security Department plans and prepares for disasters affecting Tallahassee and surrounding communities.

Environmental Services and Facilities Management

The core mission of the ERC Division is to ensure that City facilities and operations achieve and maintain legal compliance with all federal, state and local environmental laws, rules, regulations and ordinances.

Ethics Office

The Ethics Board and independent Ethics Office maintain the integrity of city government and functions.

3.3 FY17 Funding for Outside Agencies

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Throughout the annual budget process, non-profit organizations are afforded the opportunity to request donation funding from the general fund by submitting written requests. The City Commission makes the final decision on the amount and appropriation of funding for each organization. Pass-through grants from other agencies are excluded from this list.

View FY17 Funding for Outside Agencies

4.0 CAPITAL BUDGET OVERVIEW

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The City of Tallahassee (10)

4.1 Capital Budget Process

The capital budget and five-year capital improvement plan (CIP) support construction-related projects and major automation enhancements, which improve the city’s infrastructure and information technology capabilities. As with the operating budget, the capital budget is developed within the framework provided by the city’s five-year financial plan and targets and goals established by the City Commission.

Typically, departments update the five-year CIP by moving out-years forward and adding a fifth year. In some cases, projects are fast-tracked or deferred based on new priorities, availability of funds, etc. Also, the departments, with the exception of the Electric Utility and the Gas section of Underground Utilities, review all projects for the achievement of goals and objectives set forth in the comprehensive plan and for compatibility with the BluePrint 2000 Plan.

After budget instructions are developed and sent to departments, departmental capital budget requests are submitted to Financial Management. Recommendations are made based upon the departments’ priority listing and the level of funds available. This information is presented to the City Commission for consideration. The process for public input and adoption of the capital budget is concurrent with timelines discussed in the operating budget process section. Throughout the fiscal year, Financial Management monitors the capital improvement plan and provides semi-annual status reports to the City Commission.

4.2 FY17 Department Capital Projects and Descriptions

Aviation

Air Cargo Facility Expansion
This project will fund periodic inspections, preventative maintenance activities, major/minor repairs performed during outages, and replacements and improvements to the generating units and balance of plant (BOP), including, but not limited to, structures, spillway and earthwork, at the C.H. Corn Hydroelectric Generating Station to ensure compliance with all federal, state and local regulations and the safe, reliable and efficient long-term operation of the generating units.

This master project includes, but is not limited to, FERC required activities, roof coating and a turbine generator inspection. Additional unanticipated or unspecified plant repairs or improvements of higher priority can be substituted for the projects on the list and/or be funded from the master project and there is no limitation of the amount a subproject can be set up from the master.

This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations to the master projects that are not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

Future Funding

Air Carrier Apron Improvements
This project is to incorporate improvements to the air carrier apron (pavement, drainage and lighting) and will include expansion of the air carrier apron in order to expand the terminal building and to increase the number of gates and apron parking positions.

Future Funding

Air Service Development
This project is to incorporate improvements to the air carrier apron (pavement, drainage and lighting) and will include expansion of the air carrier apron in order to expand the terminal building and to increase the number of gates and apron parking positions.

FY2017 Budget: $1,000,000

Air Service Improvement Program
This is a project to improve airline service at Tallahassee Regional Airport that encompasses the market segment analysis, other studies, air service workshops, and direct contact that identifies air service opportunities that may result in formal and/or informal air service proposals and the provision of incentives for new service or needed competition to a key market as identified by the Airport Air Service Consultant that can consist of up to $300,000 of marketing/operational assistance, and/or rebate or waiver for selected airline rates and charges for up to 2 years.

FY2017 Budget: $600,000

Air Traffic Control Tower Repairs
The air traffic control tower (ATCT) at Tallahassee Regional Airport was completed in 1996. Routine maintenance and repair work is needed in order to provide a suitable working environment.

FY2017 Budget: $80,000

Aircraft Maintenance and Storage Hangar and Related Taxi Lanes
Master Plan Project - The airport needs additional storage hangars for privately owned aircraft. This project will provide for site preparation and construction of taxi lanes to support future development of hangars under a private-public partnership.

Future Funding

Airfield Lighting Improvements
Relamping of both runways and all taxiways with LED lights. This project includes changing signage locations to improve traffic flow and safety and ensuring all signs meet current FAA Standards.

Future Funding

Airfield Maintenance Sweeper T
This project will provide for the purchase of an airfield maintenance sweeper truck as specified in the FAA Advisory Circular 150/5210-24 for the removal of Foreign Object Debris (FOD) on runways, taxiways and other movement areas on the airfield, and as part of the Airports FOD removal management program.

Future Funding

Airfield Preservation - Phase II
This project is to perform necessary rehabilitation and improvements to airport pavements (runway, taxiway, and apron), associated grounds, markings, lighting, and signage, and other work to provide for short term improvements necessary to keep the airfield in compliance with standards.

FY2017 Budget: $200,000

Airport Access Roadway Realign
This project will provide for the realignment of primary airport roads that enable access to the Commercial Airline Terminal, Fixed Base Operator (FBO) Facility, and Air Cargo Facility from adjacent State Road 263.

Future Funding

Airport Emergency Power Improvements
This project will provide for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration required for improvements to emergency generators and uninterruptable power supplies associated with the airfield, fuel farm, Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) Facility and Terminal Building.

Future Funding

Airport Funfest
The Tallahassee Regional Airport is dedicated to creating a visible presence in the surrounding communities through meaningful public involvement. Staying connected to the people living in the communities that we serve, through special events and charitable giving, is vitally important to maintaining this connection. Special events provide a unique opportunity for the airport to interact with key community stakeholders, reinforce its brand and engage local businesses in a day of celebration. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended by the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

Future Funding

Airport Information Technology Analysis
This project will provide a needs assessment and report that reviews current information technology and city standards associated with airport information technology, fiber optics, cabling, data rooms, cyber security and other best practices within the airport environment necessary to meet current and future demand.

Future Funding

Airport Operations Center Renovations and Upgrades
This project will provide for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration required for improvements to the Airport Operations Center. In addition, this project will evaluate current space requirements and future needs associated with the Airport Communications Center, Airport Identification Badging Office and Training Room required to meet current and evolving FAA and TSA regulatory requirements.

Future Funding

Airport Safety Management System (SMS) Update
This project will provide the necessary updates to the current airport Safety Management System by developing, designing and implementing a program with support tools such as a computerized system which will incorporate both the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) latest guidance as per Advisory Circular 150/5200-37 under USC 14 CFR Part FAR 139 as well as implementing the newest standards.

Future Funding

Airport Safety Project II
This project will provide for the required tree removal per federal and state regulations to improve safety conditions for aircraft and mitigate wildlife hazards.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Airport Security Improvements
This project is to provide for periodic rehabilitation, retrofit and upgrades to equipment and automated systems used for airport security, safety, access control and surveillance activities. The project will also address federal regulatory compliance requirements along with physical security upgrades.

FY2017 Budget: $325,000

ARFF Station Rehab
This project will rehabilitate the existing, 20 year old, ARFF station with upgrades and improvements to the structure and interior, truck bay, and other areas to ensure it is capable of housing the latest equipment and providing for training and housing of firefighters.

Future Funding

Bucket Truck
This project is required to replace our current bucket truck which has exceeded its surface life.

Future Funding

Business/Economic Development
This is a project is to provide for business and economic development at the Tallahassee Regional Airport that encompasses studies, development of marketing strategies and promotional materials including print and digital media and participating in events to advertise opportunities as the Airport.

FY2017 Budget: $25,000

Computer Based Training Upgrades
This project will provide an upgrade in equipment and programming that both staff and airport tenants / employees must use to complete training for work in secure areas. This also includes an update to all web-based learning management and course delivery systems.

Future Funding

Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)
This project will provide the required hardware, software and programming necessary to request, assign and track work orders. The system will also provide management reports necessary to demonstrate proof of compliance for both preventive and corrective maintenance items required to maintain compliance with federal, state and local regulatory requirements.

Future Funding

Consolidated Rental Car Facilities
This project will provide for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration of a consolidated rental car and parking facility. This project will include at a minimum a two-bay car wash facility, 12,000-gallon above ground fueling facility with multi-dispensers and four two-sided vacuuming systems with independent storage cabinets to accommodate all rental car companies.

FY2017 Budget: $1,600,000

Emergency Maintenance
This project provides for the emergency repair of aging interior systems in the terminal building which must be dealt with in a time critical fashion and may include areas such as the HVAC systems, Plumbing, Electrical and Motorized Equipment.

FY2017 Budget: $30,000

Enhancements and Upgrades ATCT
The Air Traffic Control Tower at TLH was completed in 1996. A number of improvements and enhancements are needed to provide a suitable working environment. These include replacement, rehabilitation, and improvements to the roof structure, tower cab windows and interior flooring and furnishings.

Future Funding

Facilities Assessments
This project will provide for the assessment and prioritization of needed HVAC, Life Safety, Roof, Elevator, ADA Compliance and other required repairs and upgrades to airport facilities. Separate assessments will be conducted on the Air Traffic Control Tower, Terminal Building, Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) Station and Facilities Maintenance Buildings.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Facilities Building (Maintenance Complex)
This project involves scheduled and unscheduled improvements and maintenance for the Water Quality Facility. Among the recommendations proposed are additional building and roof repairs, parking lot improvements, mechanical system maintenance and repairs, and maintenance on the current security system. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned.

Future Funding

Hangar Development
The Airport Master Plan recommends additional hangars be constructed to meet forecast demand. The hangars, based on demand, will take the form of bulk, maintenance, corporate, T-hangars, and/or others, which will be funded by a combination of 2020 Sales Tax and Florida Department of Transportation funds. The project is anticipated as a two year project from Fiscal Years 2019-20.

Future Funding

Hangar(s) Development and Mode
The Airport Master Plan recommends additional hangars be constructed to meet forecast demand. The hangars, based on demand, will take the form of bulk, maintenance, corporate, T-hangars, and/or others, which will be funded by a combination of 2020 Sales Tax and Florida Department of Transportation funds. The project is anticipated as a two year project from Fiscal Years 2019-20.

Future Funding

International Port of Entry
The Electric Utility performs numerous projects at the request of citizens, businesses and organizations to repair damages to the electric system infrastructure, as well as for other specific services requested by electric customers. There are basically two types of requests: 1) specific work relative to electric facilities that are paid by the customer (e.g., pole relocation), and 2) emergency repairs necessary because of damages to electric system property that will be paid by the party responsible for the damage. The estimates are based on historical expenditures for these types of activities, and all expenditures are fully reimbursed by the requesting or responsible party. Incurred costs are billed by the utility through the city's billing and accounts receivables process.

The establishment of a International port of entry and foreign trade zone at Tallahassee Regional Airport is anticipated to facilitate economic development for the community by increasing international commerce through the airport. Establishment of a foreign trade zone requires a series of steps including development of a feasibility plan, involvement of the public and local businesses, inventory, and implementation of a marketing program. This project also could facilitate development of the airport business park, which is under consideration. This project is recommended for planning purposes contingent on the availability of funds.

Future Funding

Jet Bridge Rehabilitation
"Recurring project to provide for unanticipated repairs to Airport jet bridges. Annual appropriations not expended by the end of the fiscal year will bereturned to fund balance."

FY2017 Budget: $25,000

Marketing and Promotions Study - Phase II
To enhance offerings to customers, the Airport conducts various studies and promotions. This project will assist in attracting new and retaining current customers.

FY2017 Budget: $100,000

Miscellaneous Major/Minor Repair/Replacement/Improvements
Airport infrastructure often is in need of repair, replacement, or improvements. These types of small, immediate needs must be dealt with in a timely fashion and may include pavements, building structures, installed equipment, and/or grounds. Additionally, funding is needed for ad hoc projects that occur during the year (i.e. safety and security issues, studies, etc.). This project is a recurring project funded from Repair, Replacement and Improvement (RR&I) funds. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $175,000

Parking Area Improvements
This project provides for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration for improvements to the parking facilities. This project includes the replacement of the revenue control system, entry and exit lane equipment, technology upgrades and other related improvements.

FY2017 Budget: $600,000

Perimeter Road Rehabilitation
TSA Part 1542 and FAA Part 139 required fencing of the airfield to protect it from intrusions. A perimeter road is required to inspect that fence on a more than daily basis in all weather conditions. This project will rehabilitate and improve the existing road that was originally constructed in 2005.

Future Funding

Rental Car Improvements
This project will provide for the maintenance, rehabilitation and repair of the rental car service area, terminal rental counters, offices and parking facilities.

FY2017 Budget: $75,000

Runway 18/36 Reconstruction
This provides for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration to improve the surface of runway 18/36. Rehabilitation of the runway surface is required to maintain a proper pavement surface for aircraft and to restore the useful life of the existing pavement.

Future Funding

Safety & Security System Repairs
For repairs to the Access Control, Badging and Video Surveillance System that will periodically become necessary due to various equipment failures that are expected to occur as a result of normal life cycle failures, severe weather, power surges etc. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended by the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $60,000

Security Checkpoint Improvements
This project will incorporate the necessary facility and equipment changes required to ensure the highest levels of safety and security for our traveling public. This project will include the design, purchase, installation, and construction management necessary to incorporate required passenger screening, camera surveillance and exit lane technologies.

FY2017 Budget: $2,133,700

Security Fence and Gate Rehabilitation, Updates and Improvements
TSA Part 1542 requires the Airport Operating Area to be secure. FAA Part 139 requires the Airport to be secure from wildlife and other intrusions. To meet both of these requirements, the Airport installed over 50,000 linear feet of fencing and approximately 45 gates in 2005. This fence and gates are in need of rehabilitation and improvements to ensure its continued operation in accordance with both TSA and FAA regulations.

Future Funding

South Ramp Reconstruction
This project includes the design, engineering, bidding, construction and construction administration services required to provide for the reconstruction and rehabilitation of the south ramp. This public use ramp is critical for the smooth and efficient operations necessary to accommodate general aviation, military, business and charter aircraft.

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

Taxiway Improvements
This project is to provide a short-term rehabilitation of taxiway pavements and includes sealing cracks, seal coating, and other repairs as well as grading shoulders and stormwater ponds and associated landscaping.

Future Funding

Terminal Building Life Safety System Upgrades
This project provides for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration required to meet federal, state and local life-safety requirements. This project includes replacement of the existing fire alarm control panel and associated improvements required to ensure visual and audible notifications and life-safety egress.

FY2017 Budget: $1,911,400

Terminal Concessions Redevelop
This project provides matching funds for projects to assist the Airport’s primary concessionaire in renovation projects, including the mid-term refurbishment requirement, maintaining compatibility with the Airport’s terminal improvement projects and providing updated signage and flooring.

Future Funding

Terminal Modernization
This project provides for the design, engineering, construction and construction administration required to meet federal, state and local life-safety requirements. This project includes replacement of the existing fire alarm control panel and associated improvements required to ensure visual and audible notifications and life-safety egress.

FY2017 Budget: $1,650,000

Terminal PLB Acquisition and I
Passenger Boarding Bridges at Tallahassee Regional Airport will be 25 years old and in need of replacement. This project will replace six boarding bridges (A3, B3, B5, A5, A1 & A6).

FY2017 Budget: $1,400,000

Utility Infrastructure
This project will provide the utility infrastructure, such as electric, sewer, water, fiber optic cable, which is necessary to attract and retain new business to the parcels which have been identified within the airport strategic business plan.

Future Funding

Vehicle Replacement Upgrade-Airport Operations
This project provides funding for the aviation-specific equipment required to be installed on vehicles operating within the airport environment which are not covered by fleet vehicle replacement funding.

FY2017 Budget: $15,000

Community Relations

Commission Chambers Sound System/WCOT broadcast equipment
This project provides funding to upgrade WCOT's broadcast system and cameras in the Commission Chambers. Niche Video Products, Inc. provided the City with an assessment and project summary for a WCOT TV Facility Upgrade to HD. This project would be phased over multiple years.

Future Funding

Communications Equipment
Funding for WCOT broadcast and PIO Public Relations, Community Outreach and Web Development equipment purchases.

Future Funding

Community Beautification & Waste Management

Green Building and Yard Improvements
Efficiency improvements to the two story “Green Building” and yard to maintain the Green Building Certification

FY2017 Budget: $100,000

Community Housing & Human Services

Historic Property Preservation Grant and Loan Pool
This is a master project that provides funding for the City's Historic Preservation Grant and Loan (HPGL) Pool program. This program was established to provide grants and loans for the preservation and rehabilitation of designated historic properties. Grants and loans may be given for the stabilization or restoration of historic structures; structural repairs, facade restoration, or rehabilitation; compliance with code, health and safety requirements; and other construction activity that will result in a "total project" restoration. Preference for funding of projects is targeted first to residential projects; second to cultural, retail, and restaurant projects; and third to other types of projects. Eligibility criteria include listing on the National Register of Historic Places and zoning as a Historic Preservation Overlay (HPO) property. Presently, there are over 220 structures potentially eligible for program funding, including the districts of Myers Park, Calhoun Street, and Park Avenue. The HPGL Program carry forward cannot exceed $300,000 in any year.

FY2017 Budget: $300,000

Water and Sewer System Charge and Tap Fee Waivers
This project provides funding for the waiver of water and sewer system charges for all affordable housing (as defined by City Code Section 21-152) and tap fee waivers for affordable home ownership units.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Customer Services

Business Enterprise Systems Upgrade and Support
The Business Enterprise Systems Upgrade and Support project is a compilation of new and enhanced technology and software upgrades for the Customer Information System (CIS), Call Center Monitoring system, and Smart initiatives. The Wholesale Energy Services division uses unit commitment and dispatch software to simulate and optimize hourly, daily and weekly production runs for the Electric Utility. The same software has been used to perform economic dispatch modeling for the past 20 years.

FY2017 Budget: $298,000

Commercial Energy Conservation
This project provides low interest loans to support the city's ongoing energy efficiency/customer retention efforts in the commercial sector. The program's focus is to improve energy efficiency of commercial facilities and promote efficiency in city and other public/governmental facilities through the funding of special projects and studies. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended by the close of the fiscal year will be returned to the energy conservation fund.

FY2017 Budget: $625,000

Customer Contact Center
This project correlates with the Utility Technology Project and supports the functions to create a customer contact center.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Customer Information System an
This is a multi-million dollar project that reflects system replacement and consolidation of the Customer Information and Meter Data Management Systems

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

Residential Energy Conservation
This project provides low interest loans and rebates to support the city's existing residential energy efficiency program. This is a recurring project formerly housed in the now-defunct energy services department. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the close of the fiscal year will be returned to the energy conservation fund.

FY2017 Budget: $4,200,000

Utility Systems Data Warehouse and Systems Integration
A virtual data warehouse for data analytics will be used as a single source for data analysis. This virtual repository will be used to consolidate actionable data in order to make data driven management decisions. This virtual repository will also allow for historical data research as well as trend analysis covering the entire organization. This business intelligence or "BI" is vital to create an intelligent utility and implement the technical innovations needed.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Utility Technology Project
This is a ten year project proposed to replace the City's current Customer Information System with a Customer Relationship Management system and create a data warehouse and customer contact portal for Utility Services. FY17 will be funded fully by Utility Services. Beginning in FY18, this project will be funded by Electric, Gas, Water, Sewer, Solid Waste, Storm Water, Fire Services, General Government, and ISF allocations from Technology & Innovations.

Future Funding

Electric Utility

Advanced Transportation Mgmt System
This project will fund system updates to the Tallahassee Advanced Transportation Management System (TATMS). Staff is currently developing a project to upgrade the aging and out-of-warranty traffic signal controllers at each signalized intersection with state of the art, Advanced Traffic Controller technology. Accomplishments to date include the completion of a project to relocate the TATMS from City Hall to the Public Safety Complex. Future updates are anticipated in FY 2019 and thereafter every other year. Funding will be necessary to replace aging equipment, implement further intelligent transportation system capabilities, deploy emerging transportation technologies and improve the existing system. System enhancements will include the addition of redundant routes for the TATMS fiber optic cables, additional remote workstations, fixed overhead sign support structures with variable message signs, and expanded traveler’s information systems.

FY2017 Budget: $300,000

Camera Replacement
This project will fund replacement of the camera systems installed during and since the original TATMS project with state-of-the-art high resolution cameras that will be forward compatible with emerging digital technologies.

Future Funding

CC-ECC Building Upgrades
"This project provides for necessary improvements and upgrades to the primary and backup Electric Control Center facilities. Enhancements to the structures and equipment are frequently needed to maintain and support on-going 24/7 operations. Modifications to the current facilities will allow for improved capabilities with new technologies in monitoring, security, and operations. Procurement activities for this project will include both upgrades to existing structures and equipment as well as routine facility maintenance.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

CC-Sub-SCADA Mods & Upgrades
The scope of this project includes: routine modifications, additions and minor upgrades to the existing System Control and Data Acquisition/Energy Management System (SCADA/EMS); annual maintenance for the current SCADA/EMS, security systems, weather systems, System Control building; procurement and implementation of remote terminal units (RTUs), test equipment, printers, interface software, RTU communications, T1 multiplexers, Ethernet communications, asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switches, fiber optic switches, relay communications, protective relaying, patch panels and other equipment required to support the SCADA/EMS.

FY2017 Budget: $550,000

CC-Telecommunications/Fiber Op
This project will provide a software package that maintains a computer database of maintenance operations which also allows the airport to identify both planned (preventative) and unplanned maintenance tasks. Additionally this project will perform inventory and asset management to produce a wide variety of reports.

FY2017 Budget: $325,000

Corn Master-Outages & BOP Work
"This project will fund periodic inspections, preventative maintenance activities, major/minor repairs performed during outages, and replacements and improvements to the generating units and balance of plant (BOP), including, but not limited to, structures, spillway and earthwork, at the C.H. Corn Hydroelectric Generating Station to ensure compliance with all federal, state and local regulations and the safe, reliable and efficient long-term operation of the generating units.

This master project includes, but is not limited to, FERC required activities, roof coating and a turbine generator inspection. Additional unanticipated or unspecified plant repairs or improvements of higher priority can be substituted for the projects on the list and/or be funded from the master project and there is no limitation of the amount a subproject can be set up from the master.

This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations to the master projects that are not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $260,000

Hopkins Master-Outages & BOP W
"This project will fund periodic inspections, preventative maintenance activities, major/minor repairs performed during outages, and replacements and improvements to the generating units and balance of plant (BOP) at the Hopkins Generating Station to ensure compliance with all federal, state and local regulations and the safe, reliable and efficient long-term operation of the generating units.

This master project includes, but is not limited to, unit 1 electrical R/R, unit 1 mechanical R/R, unit 2 electrical R/R, unit 2 mechanical R/R, unit 1 stack/high tank painting, and BOP equipment and facility R/R. Additional unanticipated or unspecified plant repairs or improvements of higher priority can be substituted for the projects on the list and/or be funded from the master project and there is no limitation of the amount a subproject can be set up from the master.

This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations to the master projects that are not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance."

FY2017 Budget: $4,300,000

HP1 Replacement
Project provides funding for generation unit(s) to replace Hopkins Unit 1 which is scheduled for retirement in 2020. Exact nature and generating capacity of most efficient/effective replacement units is currently under study and will be presented to CC for approval at a later date.

Future Funding

Intersection Detection System
This project will fund detection loop repair and replacement as mandated by the FDOT traffic signal maintenance agreement. It will also fund upgrades to the video detections systems

FY2017 Budget: $125,000

Minor Intersection Safety Mods
This continuing program includes relatively minor roadway or intersection improvements to provide additional safety or reduce delay in vehicular and pedestrian movements. This work plan includes construction of additional item such as turn lanes, radius modifications, and traffic control modifications including roundabouts, installation of guard rails, and resurfacing with friction course as needed along City roadways. This program also provides for minor enhancements at intersections and mid-blocks by constructing medians, bulb-outs and raised intersections to increase safety for pedestrians. This is a recurring project; all funding not expended or encumbered at fiscal year-end will be returned to funds balance.

FY2017 Budget: $225,000

PE - Smart Grid-Automated Distribution
This project funds the acquisition of equipment, materials, supplies, contract labor, COT labor, and other associated costs required to extend and/or improve the Automated Distribution System and Associated Radio Communications System installed on the COT’s Electric Utility’s electric distribution system.

Future Funding

PE-Data Systems Support
This master project provides funding for recurring needs and activities of the Power Engineering Division GIS unit including: licensing,replacement, upgrade and implementation of hardware and software systems; staff training and certification; field inventory updates; related contractual services.

FY2017 Budget: $59,000

PE-Distribution Upgrades & Modifications
Per an exception to current administrative policy granted by DMA/Office of Budget & Policy, this master project will provide funding for new and existing specific projects and subprojects activities associated with construction of new and refurbishment/upgrade of existing distribution facilities. Utilization of this consolidated master approach to capital funding since FY 2012 has provided management greater flexibility in meeting critical system needs, reduced administrative workloads, and improved the department’s ability to affect more timely deobligations of surplus capital appropriations.

FY2017 Budget: $3,175,000

PE-New Service Installations
Per an exception to current administrative policy granted by DMA/Office of Budget & Policy, this master project will provide funding for new and existing specific projects and subprojects activities associated with construction/installation of structures/equipment required for new residential and commercial service connections. Utilization of this consolidated master approach to capital funding since FY 2012 has provided management greater flexibility in meeting critical system needs, reduced administrative workloads, and improved the department’s ability to affect more timely deobligations of surplus capital appropriations.

FY2017 Budget: $2,800,000

PE-Overhead to Underground
A FY17 Project proposed by Underground Utilities Public Infrastructure.

FY2017 Budget: $1,500,000

PE-Purchase of Talquin Electric
This project provides for the purchase of Talquin Electric Cooperative facilities within the city's electric service territory and for the installation of new services for city customers on Talquin facilities within this territory.

FY2017 Budget: $650,000

PE-Recurring-Replacements
This project provides funding for: 1) distribution, replacement and upgrade - cost for replacement of existing overhead and underground equipment/facilities, including labor and equipment; and 2) area light replacement and upgrade - cost for replacement of existing equipment/facilities, including labor and equipment.

This project is a master recurring project. Appropriations that are not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,280,000

PE-Street Lighting
This budget provides annual funding for projects to install new streetlights in locations for new or existing subdivisions and street projects. Planned projects include, but are not limited to, installation of lights for new subdivisions/minor streets and continuation of downtown lighting.

This is a recurring project. Appropriations not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,000,000

PE-Substation Modifications
Per an exception to current administrative policy granted by DMA/Office of Budget & Policy, this master project will provide funding for new and existing specific projects and subprojects activities associated with construction of new and refurbishment/upgrade of existing substations facilities. Utilization of this consolidated master approach to capital funding since FY 2012 has provided management greater flexibility in meeting critical system needs, reduced administrative workloads, and improved the department’s ability to affect more timely deobligations of surplus capital appropriations.

This is a recurring project. Funds not expended prior to close of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $3,300,000

PE-Transmission Upgrades & Mod
Per an exception to current administrative policy granted by DMA/Office of Budget & Policy, this master project will provide funding for new and existing specific projects and subprojects activities associated with construction of new and refurbishment/upgrade of existing transmission facilities. Utilization of this consolidated master approach to capital funding since FY 2012 has provided management greater flexibility in meeting critical system needs, reduced administrative workloads, and improved the department’s ability to affect more timely deobligations of surplus capital appropriations.

This is a recurring project. Funds not expended prior to close of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $3,950,000

Prod Mgmt.-Purchase/Install Distributed Generation
Based on the current 10-year strategic transmission study, supporting capital projects are required in 2010 and beyond to ensure system reliability. Options include building new transmission infrastructure and/or installing distributed generation including combustion turbines at key locations on the city's system to meet grid reliability standards. One option identified for further detailed study is the installation of combustion turbines or reciprocating engines as an alternative to the addition of major transmission facilities or to address resource uncertainty associated with the implementation of the city’s DSM plan.

FY2017 Budget: $8,000,000

Prod Mgmt-Training Solutions
This project will develop a training and certification program designed for plant operators, Electrical and Instrument (E&I) personnel and maintenance mechanics at the three Electric generation facilities. Training is critical as the equipment and the controls and software required to operate it are being updated routinely to more complex and modern technology. It provides a comprehensive, validated method, for evaluating and training plant personnel to ensure they are competent to operate and maintain the city’s facilities in a safe, effective, reliable and efficient manner.

Future Funding

Purdom Master-Outages & BOP Work
This project will fund periodic inspections, preventative maintenance activities, major/minor repairs performed during outages, and replacements and improvements to the generating units and balance of plant (BOP) at the Purdom Generating Station to ensure compliance with all federal, state and local regulations and the safe, reliable and efficient long-term operation of the generating units.

FY2017 Budget: $2,250,000

SP - Solar Capacity Expansion
The Electric Utility is continuing to promote installation of solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) systems to provide a limited diversity of energy supply, encourage use of clean energy sources, educate customers about the advantages of renewable resources, and provide energy and tradable renewable energy certificates (green tags) for existing and future retail green power offerings. This ongoing project will help to position the City for changes in the energy markets and assist the utility in responding to possible renewable energy portfolio standards. This is a recurring project.

FY2017 Budget: $630,000

PE-Overhead to Underground
A FY17 Project proposed by Underground Utilities Public Infrastructure.

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

SP-Electric System Planning Resource Studies
The scope of this project includes system planning studies/support and NERC compliance evaluation/support. In an effort to effectively manage development of the electric system relative to current and future regulatory, operational and capacity requirements, the utility must evaluate energy alternatives, facilities, infrastructure, related projects and compliance with NERC reliability standards.

FY2017 Budget: $200,000

SP-Energy Efficiency & DSM
In December 2006, the Electric Utility completed an integrated resources planning (IRP) study that identified an appropriate mix of supply and demand-side resources needed to most efficiently meet future power needs over a 20-year period. Demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency (EE) programs play a key role in that resource plan. This project provides funding to support the DSM/EE portfolio approved by the City Commission in December 2006. The budget schedule reflects the implementation plan proposed by Energy Services and approved by the City Commission in January 2008, consisting of a 2-year deferral of some expenditures originally planned for FY 2009, combined with additional funding in later years to achieve the required demand and energy savings.

Future Funding

Sustainable Traffic Signal Pil
This project will fund a pilot solar traffic signal installation once cost effective battery technologies are available.

Future Funding

T&D-Electric A/R Master
The Electric Utility performs numerous projects at the request of citizens, businesses and organizations to repair damages to the electric system infrastructure, as well as for other specific services requested by electric customers. There are basically two types of requests: 1) specific work relative to electric facilities that are paid by the customer (e.g., pole relocation), and 2) emergency repairs necessary because of damages to electric system property that will be paid by the party responsible for the damage. The estimates are based on historical expenditures for these types of activities, and all expenditures are fully reimbursed by the requesting or responsible party. Incurred costs are billed by the utility through the city's billing and accounts receivables process.

FY2017 Budget: $2,000,000

T&D-Instrumentation/Control RR
This project provides funding for installation, maintenance and upgrade of equipment to automate the control, metering and monitoring of various distribution facilities, including necessary studies to determine and identify the proper size and location of equipment.

FY2017 Budget: $65,000

T&D-Operations Center RR&I
"This project will fund needed repairs, renovations and upgrades of the utility operations center located at 2602 Jackson Bluff Road and its adjacent facilities, including the associated electric meter operations building, the 9.07 acres located between Messer Park, and the existing material storage facility. These activities will address problems associated with aging and deterioration of the facility, adding new office/storage facilities as needed, and installation and upgrade of security measures to reduce vandalism and theft.

FY2017 Budget: $1,050,000

T&D-Overhead Line RR&I
This project provides funding for refurbishment of 115/230 kV overhead transmission lines and facilities in electric system and provides for the ground-line treatment of all wood distribution and transmission poles, including: 1) equipment identification and computerized data collection of work performed; 2) visual inspection of pole and hardware attachments; 3) visual inspection of application of remedial preservative treatments to extend pole life; and, 4) pole restoration utilizing c-truss or fiber wrap systems. This project provides funding for costs associated with planting species of trees or plants to replace tall trees growing under overhead power lines.

FY2017 Budget: $170,000

T&D-Substation RR&I
This project provides funding for the inspection, maintenance and upgrade of substation facilities and equipment, including breakers, switches, relays, annunciator panel systems, multiplexors, system control and data acquisition equipment, electronic security and safety equipment, and storage facilities. This project also provides for the construction of a storage building which will house one of the city's two emergency mobile substations when not in service to provide protection from the deteriorating elements of weather.

FY2017 Budget: $735,000

T&D-URD System RR&I
This project provides funding for the replacement and/or refurbishment of deteriorated underground distribution (URD) facilities. These include replacement and installation of fault indicators, cables and URD equipment such as deteriorated pad mounted equipment, cable, conduit, and associated equipment. Additionally, this project provides for cabinet inspection of interior padmount transformers, pedestals and associated padmounted equipment and includes the following: 1) computerized data collection of work performed; 2) infrared inspection and ground resistance readings; 3) replacement of penta or hex bolts if necessary, and unlock or cut off locks if necessary; 4) insecticide treatment and install fault indicators- labor only; 5) private property access and attachment of inspection stickers; 6) installation of road markers and painting numbers on pedestal corresponding with padmount; 7) replacement of pedestal lid bolts where available -l abor only; 8) other associated minor repairs as needed; and 9) needed connector replacements and installation of fault indicators, etc.

FY2017 Budget: $1,150,000

Traffic Monitoring Travel Time
This project will fund the capital and operational cost of installing and operating a wireless travel time system on our roadways that will provide historical and real-time travel times. This system will provide before and after data of the effects on travel time as traffic signal timing changes and increased volume occur.

FY2017 Budget: $200,000

Traffic Preemption Equipment
In 1999, the Department in coordination with the City Traffic Division implemented a traffic light pre-emption system (Opticom). The purpose ofthis system was to increase safety at intersections, reduce response times and reduce fuel consumptions due to starts/stops. Since installation,the system has been valuable and performed as expected but is now considered outdated technology and outside of warranty/serviceability period.The current version of this system is more versatile and allows for broader use to include mass transit control. In exploring options for replacingthe system, the Department has met with representatives from Star Metro and Public Works finding interest in both replacing and expanding thesystem.

Future Funding

Traffic Signal Refurbishment/M
Heavy signal maintenance: remove, repaint and/or refurbish finish coating, reinstall traffic signal steel mast arm structures as needed due to paint failure or age related problems. This is a recurring project; all funding not expended or encumbered at fiscal year-end will be returned to funds balance.

FY2017 Budget: $250,000

Turning Movement Count Program
This project will continue funding the tri-annual count of traffic volume at each signalized intersection in Leon County to provide the data necessary to retime our traffic signals.

Future Funding

UPS Upgrade
This project will fund the installation, upgrade and maintenance of battery back-up systems at our traffic signals and solar school zone flashers.

Future Funding

Executive Services

Animal Shelter HVAC Repairs
This project is for HVAC repairs at the Animal Shelter. Per the approval of the City and County Commission, the County has already agreed to provide the funding for their portion. The County's portion for FY16 is $76,286 and $38,035 for FY17.

FY2017 Budget: $80,108

City Hall Cooling Towers
The current towers cannot handle the 300 tons of chilled water units and design of the building did not factor in the increased demands experienced in recent years. Consequently, problems occur when chillers operate at full capacity. The towers will need to be replaced to operate at maximum efficiency. Current estimates envision the use of helicopters to remove the old towers and replace them with new towers.

Future Funding

City Hall Master Project
A study of the HVAC system was completed in FY2013 which indicated major replacements are needed for the HVAC system due to age and energy consumption. The mechanical air handlers are 30 years old and the average life expediency is 20 to 25 years. Maintenance on the system has extended the life. The sheet metal and coils are deteriorating to the point of failure.

FY2017 Budget: $250,000

City Hall Parking Garage Waterproofing & Structural Repairs
This project provides for the elimination of the continuing water infiltration into and repairs of any structural degradation of the City Hall parking garage. An evaluation of the existing 32 year-old waterproofing membrane system over the garage will also be performed. Due to the continuing infiltration of water into the garage during heavy rain storms, funding was requested in FY14 to analyze, evaluate and prepare design documents for the repairs and possible membrane replacement. The evaluation, to date, shows that most of the leaks are at the perimeter of the garage, however completion of the evaluation (study) by the end of FY 2015, will determine if a new membrane will be needed. Design drawings will be developed and construction.

Future Funding

Fire

Facilities Management & Maintenance
This project provides for repair and maintenance of the department's fifteen fire stations, which are located throughout the Tallahassee/Leon County service area. These facilities operate twenty-four hours a day to respond to emergencies in the surrounding community. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $400,000

Fire Hydrant Maintenance & Replacement
This project supports the inspection, maintenance and painting of all city-owned fire hydrants and replacement of those determined to be beyond repair. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $874,500

Truck Bay Expansion
Modify the bay doors of the 5 county fire stations to accommodate the newer, larger fire apparatus in use by TFD today. Fire engines and trucks are larger today than when they were at the time these stations were built.

FY2017 Budget: $75,000

Fleet Management

Environmental Compliance and R
This is a continuing program, which supports environmental facilities activities and compliance with regulations of the Florida Department ofEnvironmental Protection (DEP). DEP requires that sites, which have the potential for contamination, have emergency response action plans,initial remedial action plans, discharge notification plans, quality assurance project plans, contamination assessment reports, remedial actionplans, and site rehabilitation. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the close of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $100,000

Vehicle Replacement
The fleet management program is responsible for centralized citywide vehicle and equipment acquisition, maintenance, and repair. This projectsupports a program for vehicle replacement. Funding for the program is provided by the fleet reserve, which is replenished annually through fundinterest earnings and monthly charges in user department operating budgets. This project includes a ten percent contingency to addressunanticipated needs. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned tofund balance

FY2017 Budget: $8,484,886

Parks, Recreation & Neighborhood Affairs

Animal Service Center RR&I
This project will be used to manage and fund repairs, replacements, and improvements at the Animal Service Center. Some of the potential projects will include new floors in the main hall, cat room remodel, development of a secured outside dog run for confiscated dogs, create puppy and small dog room, painting, lobby renovations, and addressing drainage issues. An additional $75,000 will be provided by the County to be used for RR&I projects at the facility.

FY2017 Budget: $75,000

Ballfield and Tennis Court Lights
Tom Brown Park's softball complex consists of five multi-use fields (softball, soccer, football) with three adjacent baseball fields, all having mostly wooden poles that support the field light fixtures. Most of these poles are 38 years old, with the majority having significant damage from pileated woodpeckers. The department has replaced the most hazardous poles on two occasions, most recently in FY2015. Now the newer poles as well as some of the older poles have new woodpecker damage. The light fixtures and electrical infrastructure are all original, and the insulation on the wiring is corroding, leaving wires exposed. This creates a significant safety hazard as the weakened, exposed wires break and come in contact with other wires or objects.

Tennis court lights at Forest meadows and Tom Brown routinely experience failing ballasts and capacitors, causing frequent outages. Approximately $40,000 is spent annually on ballasts, capacitors, bulbs, staff labor and electrical contractors to keep the lights operational.

Funds are requested to replace the light fixtures and wooden poles on ballfields at Tom Brown Park and to replace the tennis court light fixtures at Tom Brown and Forest meadows with Musco Light Structure Green system lights. In addition to saving on annual repair costs, as maintenance and repairs are covered for 25 years, energy savings of over 50% would be expected as compared to the energy costs of traditional light systems like those that are in place.

These light systems can be purchase for approximately $1,735,875.00 Lease purchase options of 5, 7 or 10 years are also available with annual payments of $375,687.67, $277,465.05 and $203,393.67 respectively.

FY2017 Budget: $278,000

Chaney Downtown Flowers
A donation has been made by Russell Chaney to provide flowers for the Downtown Tallahassee area.

FY2017 Budget: $42,529

Community Center Upgrades
In 2016 the City budgeted $75,000 in capital projects from CDBG to address facilities in low income areas of the community (defined by census tracts); initial facility repairs included Walker Ford, Jack Mclean, and the Lincoln Neighborhood Center. CHHS has identified similar facility needs and are planning on funding $500,000 in FY17, which could be recurring capital budget for the aforementioned and possibly expand to Palmer Monroe, Senior Center and PRNA.

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

East/Northeast Recreation Center
Construction of a new co-located Senior Center and Recreation Center with a shared multi-use gymnasium in the East/Northeast area, preferably on the City's Welaunee property. The 40,000 square foot Senior Center would be designed to accommodate the growing interest in lifelong learning, art and music, cards and game activities, and wellness and fitness classes. A large, highly technical, multi-purpose room could host conferences, workshops, and concerts. An on-site café and coffee shop would allow safe and comfortable gathering spaces for seniors to meet and enjoy each other’s company. The adjacent 20,000square foot Recreation Center and shared use multi-purpose gymnasium would provide programs and activities for youth and adults. Currently, there are no recreation centers in this area of the community, which has the highest number of seniors and baby boomers as well as the largest number of participants in youth athletic programs.

Future Funding

East/Northeast Senior Center
Construction of a new co-located Senior Center and Recreation Center with a shared multi-use gymnasium in the East/Northeast area, preferably on the City's Welaunee property. The 40,000 square foot Senior Center would be designed to accommodate the growing interest in lifelong learning, art and music, cards and game activities, and wellness and fitness classes. A large, highly technical, multi-purpose room could host conferences, workshops, and concerts. An on-site café and coffee shop would allow safe and comfortable gathering spaces for seniors to meet and enjoy each other’s company. The adjacent 20,000square foot Recreation Center and shared use multi-purpose gymnasium would provide programs and activities for youth and adults. Currently, there are no recreation centers in this area of the community, which has the highest number of seniors and baby boomers as well as the largest number of participants in youth athletic programs.

Future Funding

Forestmeadows Tennis Facility
Construct a new Stadium Court at Forestmeadows by converting 2 hard courts to a clay stadium court with space for increased seating and sponsor area capacity. Replace 2 hard courts at Forestmeadows and add 5 clay courts. Stadium court enhancements would include permanent seating, press box, sponsor areas and locker room. This would result in enhanced sponsor opportunities and rentals for events, plus additional economic impact to community by drawing larger tournaments. The City would also realize an increase in revenue from additional court rental fees.

Future Funding

Meadows Soccer Complex
A full size artificial turf soccer field was installed in 2006 with a life expectancy of 8 years. The field is now 10 years old. The fabric is worn out causing more and more tears, and the seams are separating and curling at the edges, both of which create trip hazards. These areas are becoming more and more difficult to repair, and the repairs don’t last very long. The Department is asking for $500,000 to upgrade the soccer complex as needed.

Future Funding

Northwest Park
Development of existing Northwest Park property to include ball fields, disc golf course, playground, community center and pool. A limited development option could include ball fields, disc golf course, playground, and comfort station/field house. Currently, there are no recreation centers or City parks in this area of the community and County park facilities in this area are over capacity.

Future Funding

Paving Projects
The Lake Leon roadway at Tom Brown Park and the Winthrop Park parking lot both have root and erosion damage, and both need to be repaved.

Future Funding

PRNA RR&I Master
This project will be used to manage and fund repairs, replacements, and improvements at various recreation facilities. Aging infrastructure and heavy use create ongoing maintenance and repair needs at all parks and facilities, and various improvements are required from time to time to continue to meet the needs of park users.

FY2017 Budget: $600,000

St. Mark Trail Extension - Lake Elberta to Lake Bradford Road
The St. Marks bike extension will connect the St. Mark’s trail from Lake Elberta to Lake Bradford Road, leading the trail into the Mosely neighborhood. This allows easier access to the trail from Downtown Tallahassee/Florida State University.

FY2017 Budget: $125,000

Planning, Land Management, & Community Enhancement (PLACE)

New Bike Boxes
Objective LM4 of the Greenprint calls for the City to facilitate the use of alternative modes of transportation. Connectivity investments within the MMTD is also a Commission priority, and in 2013 the Commission adopted an official bike route system. Therefore, the Department requests $50,000 in FY17, 18, and 19 to invest in additional bike route marking and installation of additional bike boxes. Four intersections have been installed with bike boxes already, allowing cyclists to queue in front of cars at red lights, increasing their visibility and reducing the chance of impacts when cyclist and/or cars make turns. This will also make the City more competitive in future applications for Bicycle Friendly City designation.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

New Wayfinding Signs
In October of 2014, the City Commission adopted the Wayfinding Plan, and staff has since worked with the Public Works Department to begin implementation. While funding for some of the signs was identified at time adoption, a shortfall for Downtown, Southside, and Gateway signs was noted. Completion of this program is identified as a City Commission priority.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Police

2016 COPS Grant
Similar to FY16, TPD has been authorized to apply for a COPS Hiring Program (CHP) Grant. CHP grants may be used to hire 15 new officers that will be utilized as Community Orientated Policing Liaison (COPL) Officers. These officers will be the link between generalized Patrol Officers and the Community. Their specialty training will be directly tied to COPS based programs while assisting the community in collaborative efforts within their neighborhoods. This grant supports up to 75% of eligible salary and benefits for a three year period. The city’s share of the remainder of this cost is included in the TPD operating budget. The costs for vehicles and related equipment are not grant eligible and were approved in the existing capital improvement plan for purchase in FY18 when the positions will be filled. The operating impact of these additional vehicles will be included in the fleet allocation.

Future Funding

Mobile Data Computer Lease
This project supports the lease of additional laptops for non -patrol personnel. This will allow Investigators to complete their work assignments in the field as opposed to being stationary at TPD Headquarters. This amount is still being estimated and Technology and Innovations (T&I) will provide updated amounts at a later date. The annual cost is estimated at $150,000.

FY2017 Budget: $150,000

New Body Worn Camera Implement
Nationally, and at the state level, there has been a push for mandatory use of body cameras for law enforcement officers. As a result, law enforcement agencies across the country are studying and implementing their use. Many in our service community have echoed the national sentiments to require body cameras. TPD is currently researching its implementation and the associated issues and costs. The State government has just considered and implemented mandatory policy and procedure guidelines for agencies in the use of body cameras. There are already existing deficits for storing data evidence that will necessitate a significant investment in the near future for such a project. In addition, staff to deal with the processing of video for evidentiary and public records purposes must be addressed. TPD expects the Department of Justice to offer competitive grant opportunities in FY17 through their Body Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program. The grant typically provides funding of up to $600,000 for 24 months with a required fifty-percent local match. TPD is seeking approval to apply for the grant to assist in the implementation of 425 camera systems to outfit all sworn and select non-sworn members. If selected, TPD would receive grant funds in FY18. The commission approved to fund this project at $300,000 in FY17 to help prepare and plan to receive the grant.

FY2017 Budget: $300,000

New Police Facility - construction
TPD expects the Department of Justice to offer competitive grant opportunities in FY17 through their Body Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program. The grant typically provides funding of up to $600,000 for 24 months with a required fifty-percent local match. TPD is seeking approval to apply for the grant to assist in the implementation of 425 camera systems to outfit all sworn and select non-sworn members. If selected, TPD would receive grant funds in FY18.

Future Funding

New Police Facility - planning & land
The current Police Department is in need of significant repair due to its age and use the facility. Additional space is also necessary for evidence storage, public and employee parking, and anticipated growth. Portable buildings that have been utilized as a stop gap storage measure are beginning to fail. There is very limited parking and meeting space which hinders interaction between the department and the community. Current staffing levels occupy existing space with little opportunity for expansion. The construction of a new facility would mitigate the need for many planned maintenance and repair needs of the existing facility. In total, the department estimates that there are more than $3.4 million improvements needed in the next three years.

Future Funding

New Police Facility - sale of land
The current Police Department is in need of significant repair due to its age and use the facility. Additional space is also necessary for evidence storage, public and employee parking, and anticipated growth. Portable buildings that have been utilized as a stop gap storage measure are beginning to fail. There is very limited parking and meeting space which hinders interaction between the department and the community. Current staffing levels occupy existing space with little opportunity for expansion. The construction of a new facility would mitigate the need for many planned maintenance and repair needs of the existing facility. In total, the department estimates that there are more than $3.4 million improvements needed in the next three years.

Future Funding

Police Multi-Use Property
This project supports the construction of a 3,800 square foot storage facility that would replace four portable buildings within the current TPD Headquarters complex. The portable buildings are beginning to fail which would compromise the integrity of a significant amount of evidence. A continued total of $750,000 is requested in FY2019 to complete this project.

Future Funding

Records Management System (RMS)
RMS is an agency-wide system that provides for the storage, retrieval, retention, manipulation, archiving,and viewing of information, records, documents, or files pertaining to law enforcement operations.RMS covers the entire life span of records development — from the initial generation to its completion. RMS does not address the general business functions of a law enforcement agency, such as budget, finance, payroll, purchasing, and human resources functions.An effective RMS allows single entry of data, while supporting multiple reporting mechanisms.

Examples include:

  • Incident and accident reports
  • Arrests
  • Citations warrants
  • Investigative case management
  • Field contacts
  • Pawns
  • Civil process
  • Orders and restraints
  • Permits and licenses
  • Equipment and asset management
  • Fleet management
  • Internal affairs
  • Analytical support (crime analysis)

Future Funding

Repair, Replace and Improve Police Facilities
This is an annual recurring project that supports the maintenance, repair and improvements to the Police Department headquarters facility. A total of $150,000 is requested annually over the 5 year period to support on-going building repairs, HVAC maintenance, and boiler replacement.

FY2017 Budget: $1,500,000

Requested Body Worn Camera Implementation (City funded)
TPD expects the Department of Justice to offer competitive grant opportunities in FY17 through their Body Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program. The grant typically provides funding of up to $600,000 for 24 months with a required fifty-percent local match. TPD is seeking approval to apply for the grant to assist in the implementation of 425 camera systems to outfit all sworn and select non-sworn members. If selected, TPD would receive grant funds in FY18.

The total cost over the two year period, including the grant funding is $1,270,000. This would provide all of the camera systems, implementation costs, storage, and personnel to implement and maintain the system, as well as respond to associated public records requests. A total of four new positions are included in this cost- two (2) Records Technicians, one (1) Microcomputer Specialist, and one (1) Database Analyst. Also included is the cost of an existing Senior Technical Support Analyst that would be expected to devote half of his time to this project. In total, equipment and implementation costs are $711,000; $559,000 supports the anticipated cost of salary and benefits over the 2 year period. At the end of the grant cycle all recurring costs would need to be supported by Police and IT operating budgets. This is estimated to be approximately $292,000 annually.

Future Funding

Requested Body Worn Camera Implementation (Grant Funded)
TPD expects the Department of Justice to offer competitive grant opportunities in FY17 through their Body Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program. The grant typically provides funding of up to $600,000 for 24 months with a required fifty-percent local match. TPD is seeking approval to apply for the grant to assist in the implementation of 425 camera systems to outfit all sworn and select non-sworn members. If selected, TPD would receive grant funds in FY18.

The total cost over the two year period, including the grant funding is $1,270,000. This would provide all of the camera systems, implementation costs, storage, and personnel to implement and maintain the system, as well as respond to associated public records requests. A total of four new positions are included in this cost- two (2) Records Technicians, one (1) Microcomputer Specialist, and one (1) Database Analyst. Also included is the cost of an existing Senior Technical Support Analyst that would be expected to devote half of his time to this project. In total, equipment and implementation costs are $711,000; $559,000 supports the anticipated cost of salary and benefits over the 2 year period. At the end of the grant cycle all recurring costs would need to be supported by Police and IT operating budgets. This is estimated to be approximately $292,000 annually.

Future Funding

Taser Replacement Project
TPD currently has a total of 383 working units and has a goal of providing taser devises to all sworn and reserve officers (410 total). The majority of the existing units were purchased in 2007. These are all out of date, out of warranty, and well beyond their expected useful life. They are now breaking on a routine basis. The device has been upgraded since that time with a version that has many operational improvements. These include better functioning controls, improved efficiency, advanced statistical capture of activations, as well as added capability for secondary deployments. The newer model was purchased by TPD beginning in FY11. Funding of this project supports annual recurring replacement of 82 units per year. The replacement cycle outlined will replace all of the older units in three years and all existing units within five years. It will also provide 27 additional units to outfit the remainder of sworn personnel. After the initial five years, the ongoing replacement process should be continued so that all taser units are replaced within a five year period. The annual cost increase is consistent with information provided by the vendor.

FY2017 Budget: $130,240

TRACS Server Replacement
TPD traffic accident reports are completed electronically via the TRACS system. The system provides the functionality to submit this information to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. It also provides public access to electronic accident reports that can be downloaded for a fee, generating approximately $30,000 in annual revenues to the City. The servers that house the traffic crash software and data need to be replaced for the system to continue to function. When TPD first implemented the software, existing ISS servers were utilized for this purpose. These servers are over 9 years old and are no longer covered under a maintenance warranty, nor is their operating system supported by Microsoft. Additionally, new releases of the TRACS software are not compatible with the older operating system, so updates to the system are not available to TPD.

FY2017 Budget: $63,300

StarMetro

StarMetro - Miscellaneous A/R
This accounts receivable project will allow StarMetro to enter small contractual arrangements with third parties. Examples would include vendors that would like to construct bus shelters, bus stop signs or install advertising equipment on buses. Other examples would include training provided by StarMetro to third parties that reimburse StarMetro for the cost of the training (i.e. Bus simulator and CDL training). These are estimates only.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Technology & Innovations

Applications and Database Upgrades
The City of Tallahassee adopted various enterprise solutions in 1999 by implementing various citywide applications including Oracle as the database agent of choice and PeopleSoft for standardized financials, HR, payroll and utility billing services. Upgrades are required to stay current with applications and maintain functionality of the systems.

FY2017 Budget: $650,000

CDA Storage and Virtual Server
CDA - Storage and Virtual Server - Necessary storage required by the Consolidated Dispatch Agency for email and file shares. This was not originally included because of not knowing what was required for the agency to be operational.

FY2017 Budget: $150,000

City Building Computer Wiring Upgrades
This recurring project provides for upgrading wiring within city government buildings to meet requirements for high-speed data transport, video teleconferencing, and video training services to desktop computers and telephone devices. The project also provides for a migration from the present wiring infrastructure to meet requirements of city users. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

City Building Computer Wiring Upgrades
This recurring project provides for upgrading wiring within city government buildings to meet requirements for high-speed data transport, video teleconferencing, and video training services to desktop computers and telephone devices. The project also provides for a migration from the present wiring infrastructure to meet requirements of city users. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Enterprise Wide CityWorks Implementation
Continued incremental implementation of CityWorks to departments, such as Public Infrastructure, Utility Services, Sewer, Traffic, Electric, Water Production, Water Quality, T&I, Solid Waste. This includes the Consulting Services and Systems implementation costs.

FY2017 Budget: $300,000

Growth Management Permitting
Permitting System Software and Hardware upgrades. Permits IVRS software licensing and hardware support, Public Permit portal licensing.

FY2017 Budget: $150,000

Microsoft Office "365"
Microsoft Office 365 is a subscription service giving City users access to email, calendar, contacts, and Office desktop applications from virtually anywhere across multiple devices. City users will have the ability to use the desktop version at the office or stream the live apps from any device connected to the Web.

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

Network Infrastructure Upgrade/Replacement Project
This project provides funding for infrastructure upgrades and/or replacement of network file servers, hubs and ancillary equipment. This ongoing project provides for a five-year progression of upgrades and replacements necessary to support demands of the citywide information technology initiatives.

FY2017 Budget: $600,000

Permits and Enforcement Tracking
This project will provide funding for product, license and service acquisitions in accordance with administrative obligations specified in the agreement between the City of Tallahassee and Leon County for an integrated permit and enforcement tracking system (PETS).

FY2017 Budget: $197,600

Server Upgrade
This project funds the necessary upgrades for the servers located at City Hall. These servers provide the support mechanisms for enterprise systems such as PeopleSoft, databases, printing, domain controllers, virtual serves and desktops. It also provides the upgrades and enhancements for data storage for all servers located in the City Hall data center.

FY2017 Budget: $450,000

Technology Innovations
Provides for the evaluation and testing of software, hardware and associated licenses to support innovative technical approaches. This project will also be used to subsidize additional user licenses for existing dashboard, ETL and developer productivity tools.

FY2017 Budget: $300,000

Telephone Switch/Telephone Net
Telephone System Upgrade - Upgrade all 17 telephone switches from TDM to Voice over IP System. Due to upgrade in FY15 of Utilities IVR and Utility OMS systems, the level of service for the IVR can increase from 10 T1's to 30 T1's increasing customer calls during storms. This will also allow remote customer call center operators to work from their homes instead of the call center. Implementation and replacement of core infrastructure switches that interconnect telecommunications and network switching.

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

Work and Asset Management System Upgrade
Cartegraph Navigator has been used by the Public Works Department for almost a decade as our work and asset management software. The software has been upgraded a number of times including recently to version 8.4 which adds compatibility with ESRI ArcMap version 10.2. Past effort was made to integrate mobile devices into the workflow with the intent of decreasing repetitive tasks, increasing work-process efficiency, and reducing long term operational costs. However, the Trimble mobile devices and the Cartegraph Navigator software are nearing the end of their developmental lifecycle and future support will be limited beyond the next three to five years. Staff is working with ISS and other departments to implement a city-wide work and asset management system with a goal of having a pilot project implemented within the Drainage Operations unit (220502) by the end of 2015. The product currently being evaluated by the City is CityWorks which is a GIS-based, web application that leverages the City’s investment in GIS systems and applications. Web/mobile-based an important because there is no the reliance on legacy hardware technology or future costly hardware upgrades. The new system will run on the devices already being used by staff such as iPhones, iPads, Android devices, laptops, etc. The CityWorks system uses a subscription-based licensing model with implementation services and any system add-ons being separate costs. The main issue facing this program is the availability of funding for acquisition of additional services, support, etc. outside of the funding allocated in the Operating Budget for licensing fees. An annual, recurring funding allocation needs to be implemented in support of the work and asset management system so that staff has the flexibility to adapt to the ever-changing landscape of software and mobile technology. Funding is being requested to cover the implementation costs in FY 2016 ($100,000) and an annual, recurring allocation beginning in FY 2017 ($50,000 per year) is being requested to cover acquisition of additional services, purchase additional hardware or software, etc. all in support of the work and asset management system.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Underground Utilities & Public Infrastructure

2 Think About Personal Pollution (TAPP)
The TAPP (Think About Personal Pollution) Campaign is an ongoing water quality enhancement project originally funded through a Section 319 Nonpoint Source Management grant from the US-EPA. The Campaign is a multi-media and community outreach effort, which surveys indicate has been successful in reducing stormwater pollution that reached our lakes, streams, and ponds.

FY2017 Budget: $125,000

2017 Maintenance Resurfacing
Historically, funding for street maintenance was allocated on a “worst first” strategy based on a roadway condition index. As a consequence, the typical treatment for those roads in the worst condition ranged from milling and resurfacing to total reconstruction. Unfortunately, these treatments are also by their nature the most costly. By allocating the limited available funding in this manner, fewer roadway miles can be addressed in a given year. This results in more deterioration of a greater percentage of the existing roadways and a gradual but persistent decline in the overall condition of the community’s roads.

FY2017 Budget: $500,000

2017 Maintenance Sidewalks
UUPI is responsible for nearly 500 miles of sidewalks within the city limits. These sidewalks are subject to deterioration from vehicular loading, tree roots, and other age and environmental impacts. Historically, the City has not used a program approach for sidewalk maintenance. Repairs have generally made based on citizen calls or are associated with other improvements scheduled in the area. There is not currently a process in place for systematic review of existing sidewalk conditions, nor is there identified funding specifically allocated for sidewalk repair. Staff is currently developing a scope for a consultant to provide sidewalk assessment and recommendations, similar to that proposed for pavement management. The goal is to develop and maintain a comprehensive inventory of sidewalk maintenance needs and to recommend a funding strategy to adequately address the ongoing maintenance issues associated with this important asset.

FY2017 Budget: $825,000

Alternate Fuel Program
Underground Utilities often designs, constructs, and expands its natural gas mains to provide service to outlying areas. Gas Administration has outlined a strategic plan to incorporate alternative fuels programs for dispensing compressed natural gas/liquid propane to economically feasible end-users, as well as deferring system expansion costs in outlying areas when alternative fuel delivery is a cost feasible option to distribution customers. This program is required to keep invested state licenses active and in full effect during the next fiscal year. Appropriations will also cover a cost feasibility study to be conducted prior to the implementation of the program

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Automation Implementation
This project involves the development and implementation of a Geographic Information System (GIS) database mapping and facility inventory system for the department's Gas, Water & Sewer Utilities. Funding is provided for field surveys to locate existing gas valves/facilities, quality assurance/quality control gas facilities, modeling, prepare data input and editing, integration to GIS from engineering designs and documents, purchase and maintain gas applications pertaining to leak surveys and cathodic protection, purchase and maintain hardware and software pertaining to gas applications, purchase hardware and software pertaining to locating facilities, staff training, gas code compliance suite, mobile GIS, mobile GPS, work management, and field force automation.

FY2017 Budget: $332,500

Backflow Reimbursem*nt Program
Changes from the Chapter 21, Article VIII, Division 1, Sec 21-261 Cross Connection Code amendment provide better incremental enforcement options to achieve customer compliance with testing customers’ backflow prevention assemblies (BFPA’s) other than discontinuance of water service. One option for residential customers to comply with testing their BFPA’s is to participate in the “Opt-In” Testing Program. Under this program, the biennial (every two years) backflow test will be performed by an approved tester under contract with the City of Tallahassee for which a cost of $3.00 per month will be applied to the customer’s monthly utility bill. The water service customer will remain registered in the program until written cancellation is received from the customer. Customers who have failed to have their devices tested and are delinquent after two notices will automatically be enrolled in the program. Funding represents an expected 50% participation of residential customer.

FY2017 Budget: $249,000

Briarwood Subdivision Ditch Stabilization (Blue Bay Lane)
The 1000 foot section of ditch running through the Briarwood subdivision has eroded to the point that it is affecting several homes. The ditch does not only affect adjacent properties but it can also affect water quality and the Cities National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. This ditch reaches of the Lafayette Creek drainage system. Stormwater is conveyed from the area south of Apalachee Parkway and east of Capital Circle SE through the Briarwood Subdivision and eventually to upper Lake Lafayette. The ditch is currently unimproved and the cross over pipe under Blue Bay Lane is rusted out. The proposed design will include stabilization of the ditch banks and replacement of the crossover pipes under Blue Bay Lane. In FY 2014, Public Works Drainage Operations was working to obtain drainage easem*nts through the subdivision. Project cost is based upon our staff engineer's estimate.

Future Funding

C.K. Steele/Governors Walk
Governor’s Walk will be built down Adams Street from Tennessee Street to Brevard Street. The project is anticipated to be completed in two years. The first year includes the design and permitting process for each phase of the project and the second year will initiate construction for project completion. Information for this project was requested at the June 20, 2016 City Commission Budget Workshop.

FY2017 Budget: $250,000

Carbon Bed Replacement
The City has five active granular activated carbon (GAC) units located at water well facilities which are used to remove ground water contaminants. The need to change the carbon is related to water demand and other factors. Exchange of the GAC is expected to be an ongoing process with these units. GAC units are closely monitored for Florida Department of Environmental Protection compliance by the Water Quality Division. Chemical analyses indicate carbon replacement schedules. Carbon planned for replacement includes FY17 - Well 9, FY18 - Wells 6, 7 and 13, FY19 - Wells 2 & 4.

FY2017 Budget: $200,000

CCSE Air Release Valve Change
Water Resources Engineering has developed construction plans to replace the six (6) remaining cast iron ARVs on the 42” forcemain due to corrosion damage. Replacement ARV will be stainless steel or equivalent.

FY2017 Budget: $200,000

Collection System Rehabilitation/Replacement
Sewer collection infrastructure must be rehabilitated or replaced to extend the expected life and reduce stormwater infiltration and inflow. These projects are prioritized each year based on maintenance reports, with design and construction usually done in-house and coordinated, when possible, with roadway projects. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $2,775,000

Correction of ADA Deficiencies
Since the 1992 enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), many developments within the City of Tallahassee and Leon County have been constructed and accepted by the city for ownership and maintenance even though portions of the sidewalk systems did not comply with the ADA. For the past ten years, as City staff, area developers and local contractors have become more familiar with the technical requirements of full compliance and as the City’s development acceptance process better addresses this issue, the recurrence of this situation has been, and will continue to be, diminished. There remains a large inventory of sidewalks that are not compliant with the ADA within subdivisions for which the City is responsible for maintaining the right-of-way. This capital program request seeks to obtain a recurring funding source that can be proactively utilized to correct these deficiencies by addressing the most flagrant deficiencies first with the ultimate goal of seeking full compliance. If approved, annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the close of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $100,000

DEP In-Kind Services
The definition and scope are unknown at this time. FDEP has not finalized the Amended Consent Order with civil penalties. An in-kind project must be either an environmental enhancement, environmental restoration or a capital/facility improvement project. A project has not yet been determined.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Digester 3 Rehabilitation - Heating, Mixing, Cover Modifications
Digester number three needs new heating system, mixing system, cleaning and cover modifications. Specialty inspection and design services are needed.

Future Funding

Effluent Pond 5 Liner Replacement
Effluent Storage Pond 5 is in need of a pond liner replacement. The existing liner is past the life expectancy and is damaged beyond repair.

FY2017 Budget: $ 2,500,000

Enhanced Asphalt Treatment Maintenance Program
Approximately twelve years ago, the City applied stamped and painted asphalt treatments to selected roadways and intersections throughout the downtown area. Since that time, additional surface treatment enhancements, primarily at pedestrian crosswalks, have been included with some of the newer projects, such as along Gaines Street and Monroe Street. Although Monroe Street is owned by the FDOT, the City has agreed to maintain the crosswalks in exchange for the FDOT paying for the initial installation. Public Works is currently in the process of considering various treatments to be used for enhancing asphalt services. One of the first areas to be addressed once a treatment method is selected will be the Adams Street Commons area. This request is for a recurring annual appropriation that can be utilized to address those areas where the surfaces are most worn. This approach is recommended rather than a larger less frequent appropriation as the surface areas will wear out at differing rates depending on roadway usage and type of materials used. If approved, annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the close of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $ 250,000

Facility Building Improvements
This project involves scheduled and unscheduled improvements and maintenance for the Water Quality Facility. Among the recommendations proposed are additional building and roof repairs, parking lot improvements, mechanical system maintenance and repairs, and maintenance on the current security system. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned.

Future Funding

FAMU Way
This project involves the construction of a new 1.3 mile extension of FAMU Way from Wahnish Way to Lake Bradford Road and improvements to existing FAMU Way between Monroe Street and Wahnish Way to achieve the same standard. Phase I of the project extends from MLK Boulevard to Pinellas Street and the proposed typical section consists of 2 traffic lanes with bike lanes, parking and sidewalks on both sides. Phase II extends from Pinellas Street to the intersection of Gamble Street and Eugenia and the proposed typical section consists of 2 traffic lanes with bike lanes; plus parking and sidewalks on the east side and a multi-use trail by Blueprint on the west side. Phase III extends from Gamble Street to Lake Bradford and Phase IV extends at the east end of the project from MLK Boulevard to Monroe Street. Phase III and Phase IV typical sections are yet to be determined. The original budget for Phase III was based on minor costs for FAMU Way from the Gamble /Eugenia intersection to Lake Bradford, resulting from utilizing the existing Gamble Street corridor for this section with some additional landscaping. Staff has developed an alternate design, designated as Phase III, which would reconstruct and realign the stretch of FAMU Way south from Lake Bradford, and through the existing Wastewater Treatment Plant. This option would provide Blueprint 2000 opportunities to build a regional stormwater facility (for water quality and floodplain management) between the road and the existing CSX railroad tracks. The additional cost required for this redesign is shown by year below.

Future Funding

Frenchtown Drainage System Improvements
Proj. 02279 was advanced funded from SW fees, with BP2000 funds expected to reimburse the SW fund for the required match ($1,346,236) of the EPA grant ($1,645,400) obtained per the 10/10/01 agenda item approved by the CC. The planned total future appropriation is $11,645,400 w/$10,000,000 funded from BP2000 revenue thru FY2011 funding the Frenchtown project, and zero funding from the SW fund.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Gadsden Street - Harrison Street to Magnolia Street
This project will construct a sidewalk on South Gadsden Street between Harrison Street and Magnolia Drive. It is a highly ranked project on the City’s Prioritized Sidewalks list and will improve sidewalk connectivity within Tallahassee’s south side.

Gas Recurring Projects
The Gas Utility Division performs a variety of capital project activities designed to meet recurring operating requirements. Projects include procurement of meters for new service requests, replacement of obsolete meters, and repaving of utility cuts. This is a recurring project. Appropriations that are not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $ 1,781,637

Gas Service Request
This project provides funding for repairs to gas mains from damages made by gas customers. The estimates are based on historical expenditures for this type of activity and all expenditures will be fully reimbursed by gas customers. Costs for repairs will be billed through the city's billing and accounts receivable process. This project is also used for the City's Internal Piping Program whereby the City contracts with a local plumber to install internal gas piping. The City is fully reimbursed by the customer for this service; the City also adds an administrative fee for this service. Costs for this program will be billed through the city's billing and accounts receivable process. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended at the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Gas System Expansion
This project funds the expansion of the gas distribution system serving residential, commercial, and industrial customers. Prior to opening any projects, the department will develop a payback analysis for each individual project. This is a recurring master project. Appropriations that are not utilized to fund specific projects prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,272,050

Glendale Storm Retrofit
The Glendale neighborhood is located at the northwest corner of Thomasville Road and Bradford Road. The neighborhood, originally plated in 1939, consists of Forest Avenue (North Forest, West Forest, and East Forest), Florida Avenue, and Laurel Street with approximately 85 residences.

Initially, the neighborhood was selected for a resurfacing project, but the utility coordination process identified a need for water and sewer improvements. Through the public outreach related to the utility project, many residents expressed concerns about stormwater problems that plagued the neighborhood and they requested the City address the problems. Over a period of several weeks, staff conducted multiple site visits during rain events to observe runoff and other existing drainage conditions with the ultimate goal of determining the scale of the improvements needed and identifying any existing infrastructure in need of maintenance.

Observation revealed the scale of the stormwater improvements was too large to include with the resurfacing project and needed to be a standalone capital project. The stormwater improvements will address the following issues: (1) the lack of existing infrastructure contributes to standing water in the road and on private property; (2) elevation differences between the roadway and adjacent properties allows runoff to leave the roadway and flow onto private property resulting in excess erosion and sediment loss; (3) existing ditches, culverts and other infrastructure are undersized and do not meet current level of service standards; (4) stormwater runoff cannot efficiently enter the outfall system on Thomasville Road.

Funding is requested to cover the costs of constructing the stormwater improvements for the neighborhood which may include curb and gutter, ditch stabilization, inlets, and other enclosed conveyance system enhancements. The resurfacing will be funded separately from the annual, recurring street resurfacing project. The street resurfacing will be completed in conjunction the stormwater improvements. Design for the project is being funded out of FY 2015 monies made available by the Stormwater Division. Funding for construction is requested for FY 2016 and the estimated cost for construction is $750,000.

FY2017 Budget: $350,000

Grit Chamber Equip. & Screen Sys.
Purchase third grit chamber equipment and third mechanical screen equipment. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned.

FY2017 Budget: $2,000,000

High-Pressure System Upgrade
This project provides funding for engineering, purchases of equipment, staff training, construction, and related activities associated with the expansion, additions or improvements to the gas high-pressure facilities. Activities also include replacement of remote terminal units (RTU) at various locations, updating and maintaining the gas hydraulic model through the purchase of new hardware/software, and training.

FY2017 Budget: $115,000

Inflow Monitoring and Testing
This project supports the identification of sources of infiltration or inflow into the sanitary sewer system. Identification methods include smoke testing, monitoring flows, and televising. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $300,000

Jackson Bluff Road Reconstruct
Jackson Bluff Road from Essex Drive west to Century Park Drive shows significant deterioration and needs to be reconstructed. The current degraded condition of the pavement is a direct result of poor subgrade conditions. To properly repair this roadway, a full depth reconstruction with over excavation to remove the poor soils will be required. This scope of work and the associated costs warrant this project being addressed as a stand-alone capital improvement project rather than being addressed through the annual resurfacing program.

Future Funding

Lower Central Drainage Ditch Erosion Control Project
The project objective is to address severe erosion along the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD) from Gamble Street to Springhill Road. The most severe erosion is from Kissimmee Street to Springhill Road. The majority of the CDD is under private ownership, so land acquisition will be required. It is envisioned that the solution concept will consist of armoring the bottom and sides of the ditch with Gabions with maintenance access paths and fencing along both sides of the ditch.

Future Funding

Maclay Commerce Dr./ Maclay Blvd. Street Imp.
This project will include improvements to Maclay Commerce Drive and Maclay Boulevard. These improvements will support additional Placemaking initiatives proposed for the Market District. Improvements may include multiple roundabouts, landscaping and enhanced pedestrian features.

FY2017 Budget: $350,000

Madison Street and Gaines Street Supplemental Stormwater Outfall
This project proposes to construct a large storm drain pipe in Bicycle Boulevard between Madison Street and Gaines Street to provide additional stormwater conveyance for redevelopment, improve the stormwater system's level of service and reduce the potential for flooding of Gaines Street. Runoff from the downtown area is conveyed in an underground piping system and is discharged to a regional stormwater facility on Lake Bradford Road. During intense rainfall events when the underground piping system cannot accept anymore runoff, runoff will flow overland to the recently redeveloped Gaines Street corridor. Projected costs are engineer’s estimates based upon historical property acquisition, engineering design and construction costs.

FY2017 Budget: $2,000,000

Market Square Pond Improvements - BPRK
Improvements to existing retention pond facilities and adjacent green space, located at Maclay Commerce Drive and Maclay Boulevard South, such that it can be used as part of an ongoing effort to reclaim public spaces and develop urban parks around existing stormwater facilities.

FY2017 Budget: $8,365,000

Master Sewer Plan Improvements
This project is to construct major sewer infrastructure, including pumping stations, force mains, and gravity sewer mains, to provide city sewer services in accordance with the 2035 Sewer Master Plan. Individual projects will be established based on the capital project phasing included in the Master Plan. This is a master recurring project. Funds that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $2,260,000

Master Water Plan Improvements
This project funds the construction of water distribution infrastructure in accordance with the 2010-2030 Water Master Plan. Improvements identified in the plan include major upgrades and replacement of distribution piping and water production/storage facilities to maintain proper water capacity and system pressure to provide adequate fire flows, maintain good water quality, and address future growth. Individual projects will be established based on the projected capital project program included in the Master Plan. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $ 4,060,000

McCord Pond Ditch Improvements
Ditch erosion has enlarged the ditch to a point that encroachment into the adjacent residential and commercial properties is beginning to occur. This ditch runs northeast from Betton Road, behind residential properties on Trescott Drive and commercial properties on Thomasville Road, behind the Circle K on Thomasville Road near Betton Road. The ditch is in a 48-foot wide right-of-way and is approximately 10 feet deep with nearly vertical side slopes. The ditch is 1,250 feet in length and affects 11 residential and 5 commercial properties. Access to this ditch is at the north end at Post Road. Any stabilization maintenance required (placement of sandbags, installation of rip rap, etc.) must be done by hand. Preliminary design would install a 7-foot by 15-foot box culvert. The estimated cost of construction is $1,884,000 and the estimated cost of design is $188,400. Total cost is estimated at $2,072,400. We are requesting the design and construction funding over two years as this is a relatively large project will require design and construction over two fiscal years. Funds requested for FY2017 are for the design. Construction funds will be requested for FY2018. This project's cost estimate was made according to staff's knowledge of the cost of similarly sized projects.

FY2017 Budget: 188,400

Medium Stormwater System Improvements
This project provides funding for medium sized stormwater problems to be addressed in a timely manner. Problem areas are analyzed under the Small Project Initiative Program (SPI) and at times the solution exceeds the resources allocated to the SPI Program. This project provides construction funding for these somewhat larger (medium sized) stormwater problems to be addressed in a timely manner. Projected costs are engineer’s estimates, based upon Water Resources Engineering historical project construction costs. This is a recurring project. All appropriations not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $2,500,000

Minor Stormwater Improvements
The recurring project’s scope is to resolve various minor stormwater problems that occur during the year. These are maintenance and minor improvements to the stormwater infrastructure system including, but not limited to: material acquisition, permitting, design and land acquisition. The National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit requires that 62 of the entire stormwater system be inspected annually. Also, the Northwest Water Management District (NWFWMD) testing requirements will increase as new facilities are accepted for maintenance. These increased levels of inspections will inevitably reveal additional maintenance requirements. Construction costs continue to increase due to the economic environment and cost of raw materials. Annual appropriations not expended to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the stormwater fund.

FY2017 Budget: $425,000

Miscellaneous Stormwater Engineering
Drainage Basin: City Wide. This project provides a source of funding for various miscellaneous stormwater problems or issues, which the Stormwater Division is called on to address, and which are not funded in the capital improvement plan (CIP). Typically, this work requires some engineering, surveying or other services and this project provides the Stormwater Division with a funding source to provide those activities. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the close of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $80,000

Myrick Road Outfall Ditch Improvement
Over the years, erosion has enlarged the ditch to a point that encroachment into the adjacent residential properties has had to be addressed in the past and continues to approach other properties. This ditch runs behind houses on both Myrick Road and Rhonda Drive. The ditch is in a 20-foot wide right-of-way and is 6 feet deep with nearly vertical side slopes. It is 1,200 feet in length and affects 21 residential properties in the Forrest Heights/Holly Hills neighborhood. The only access to this ditch is at the east and west ends and requires the drainage weed and brush crews to mow the ditch by hand utilizing weed eaters. Any stabilization maintenance required (placement of sandbags, installation of rip rap, etc.) must also be done by hand, utilizing wheelbarrows and the inmate crew.

Preliminary design would install a 42-inch RCP with five structures. The estimated cost, including the design fees, is $232,000.00. Design and construction funding are budgeted within the same year as because this is a relatively small project can be completed within one fiscal year. This project's cost estimate was made according to staff's knowledge of the cost of similarly sized projects.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

New Mobile Work Management
This project will provide funding for the replacement of the current Mobile Work Management application in use by Underground Utilities. This application is nearing end of life and is in need of replacement.

FY2017 Budget: $125,000

Northwest Tank Construction
Construction of a one-million gallon elevated storage tank to meet future demands based on projected population growth in the northwest area. This is a specific project which will require appropriations in multiple years.

Future Funding

Northwest Water Quality Initiative
Underground Utilities customers have been experiencing discolored drinking water in the northwest water service area. The discoloration is a result of buildup of naturally occurring iron in the distribution system, causing the pipes to require cleaning to be renewed to the customer service level expected of us. Approximately 100 miles of distribution pipe and three water supply wells serve this area which need to be routinely cleaned and/or rehabilitated. Underground Utilities Engineering and Operations are working closely together to identify the sources/causes of the water quality problems and to develop and implement solutions to provide customers the same high quality water as experienced throughout the City. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned.

FY2017 Budget: $125,000

Nova 2010 Sidewalks
This project provides for constructing sidewalks on proposed bus routes in support of StarMetro's Nova 2010 initiation.

Future Funding

NPDES Municipal Stormwater Per
This is an ongoing project associated with permit compliance imposed by the State of Florida.

FY2017 Budget: $125,000

Nurse's Drive
This project involves construction of a new (.4-mile) two-lane street on right-of-way donated by Tallahassee Memorial Regional Medical Center (TMRMC) from Centerville Road to TMRMC's extension of Surgeon's Drive. The new two-lane curb and gutter street would include bike lanes and sidewalks and provide a connecting link between Centerville Road and Miccosukee Road via Nurse's Drive and Surgeon's Drive. Right-of-way documents have been signed by TMRMC, but will not be recorded until Surgeon's Drive extension is built by TMRMC and accepted by the City, at which time the city has 10 years to let a construction contract for Nurse's Drive or its right-of-way will revert back to TMRMC.

Future Funding

Pershing Street - Adams Street
This project will construct a sidewalk on Pershing Street between Adams Street and Monroe Street. It is a highly ranked project on the City’s Prioritized Sidewalks list and will improve sidewalk connectivity within Tallahassee’s south side.

Future Funding

Pipeline Cleaning
Underground Utilities customers have recently been experiencing discolored drinking water in the northwest service area. While not the root cause of the discoloration, the discoloration is a result of buildup of an iron-reducing biofilm in the distribution system causing the pipes to require cleaning to be renewed to the customer service level expected of us. Approximately 100 miles of pipe need to be cleaned and rejuvenated. Historically we have used a third party vendor for this major renewal process (the last time was about 10 years ago). After significant research and a pilot project is was determined that it would be less costly do train staff, purchase equipment, and undertake this major project in-house, and that the quality of the work and customer service is increased. This gives us the advantage at the end of the process to utilize the equipment and staff to make pigging appropriate pipe a normal part of our operations thus avoiding the need to future major cleaning efforts.

FY2017 Budget: $100,000

Pump Station 12 Force main
This project entails the design, environmental permitting, easem*nt acquisition, and construction of a new sanitary sewer forcemain beginning at Pump Station 12 on West Orange Avenue and terminating in the vicinity of Pump Station 149 on Springhill Road.

FY2017 Budget: $1,025,000

Pump Station Renovation & Maintenance
The Distribution and Collection Division operates and maintains 107 pumping stations. Pumping stations are scheduled for periodic maintenance and upgrades based upon the age and condition of the grounds, structures, and/or equipment. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned.

FY2017 Budget: $850,000

Pumping Station Replacement Master Project
The City operates 112 pumping stations in the sewer collection system and annually prioritizes those stations due for replacement or major upgrades. This project provides for the design, purchase and installation of equipment and structures to adequately and reliably pump sewage throughout the collection system. This is a master recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $525,000

Railroad Avenue
This project will provide for reconstruction of 0.25 mile of Railroad Avenue as a revitalized connection between FAMU Way and Gaines Street. This project will be a component of the Gaines Street revitalization efforts. Improvements will include enhanced bike and pedestrian amenities, possible lane relocations, enhanced lighting and landscaping and the conversion of overhead utilities to underground facilities along the corridor.

Future Funding

Rainfall and Stream Gauging - Stormwater Project
The program is funded through a joint agreement among the City, Leon County, and the Northwest Florida Water Management District. The project is an annual recurring project to gather rainfall and stream flow data necessary to continually update stormwater computer models and to ensure reliability of designs. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the close of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $111,000

Refurbish Pivots 1 2 & 5
Refurbish sprayfield pivots and upgrade the 13 original water valve boxes with new control valves, ARV (air release valves, and isolation valves.

FY2017 Budget: $40,000

Residential Sidewalks and Bike Ped Implementation Program
This project combines funding authorized by City Commission Policy 600CP for the Sidewalk Program and for the City Commission authorized Traffic Calming Program. Revisions to the traffic calming program approved by the City Commission have significantly reduced the number of projects that qualify for funding. Emphasis is placed on sidewalk improvements including in-fill sidewalks and missing link segments. It is anticipated that these funds will be used to supplement the design and construction of sidewalk projects through the Multimodal projects priority list. All sidewalks and ramps constructed must meet the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) criteria. These funds also support the Street Resurfacing Program on the construction of sidewalk / ADA ramps. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended at the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $580,800

Roadway - Raymond Diehl Road PASS
The Raymond Diehl Road PASS project will improve pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular roadside safety along the Raymond Diehl Road corridor from Killearn Center Blvd. to Olson Road. Currently the roadway has deep open ditches and drop offs adjacent to the travel lanes along portions of the roadway. The project will consist of adding curb and gutter, closing the roadside ditches, installing stormwater inlets and conveyance, constructing a new sidewalk along the one side of the roadway and bicycle lanes throughout the project limits.

FY2017 Budget: $1,300,000

Roadway - Richview Road Pass
The Richview Road PASS project will improve pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular roadside safety along the Richview Road corridor from Apalachee Parkway to East Park Avenue. The project will consist of adding curb and gutter, closing the roadside ditches, installing stormwater inlets and conveyance, a new sidewalk along the one side of the roadway and bicycle lanes from Apalachee Parkway to Spring Forest Road. Additional sidewalk improvements will be constructed from Spring Forest Road to Park Avenue to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. This corridor is an important link for adjacent residential subdivisions to access transit on Apalachee Parkway.

FY2017 Budget: $1,100,000

Roundabout Intersection Kerry
The roundabout at the intersection of Kerry Forest Pkwy and Shannon Lakes Dr. serves approximately on average 24,000 vehicles per day. The existing pavement within the roundabout is exhibiting several deformations including rutting, shoving and an increase in cracking. It is impractical to perform maintenance on the roundabout at this time because any maintenance would not be cost effective and would only provide a temporary and short-term fix.

We are requesting funding for the design and construction of replacing the current roundabout with concrete. The estimated costs for design and construction of this project are $380,000 ($80,000 for design in 2019. and $500,000 for construction in 2020).

Future Funding

Royal Oaks Creek Stormwater Improvements
Definition and Scope - The project objective is to alleviate structural flooding, yard flooding and erosion of several residential properties located adjacent to the Royal Oaks Creek. Additionally, this project will evaluate options that address the severe erosion of properties and stormwater outfalls abutting the watercourse; and thereby reduce the sediment transport downstream towards the Killearn Chain of Lakes. The project will also evaluate the potential to remove previously deposited sediments from ditches and ponds within the system.

FY2017 Budget: $750,000

Sewer Line Relocation/Adjustment for Roadways
Sewer collection infrastructure in conflict with proposed roadway and stormwater facility improvements must be relocated and adjusted. The scope and cost of these relocations/adjustments vary with each project and cannot be accurately determined until final construction plans are available. The projected five-year funding levels are based on preliminary Florida Department of Transportation, Blue Print 2000, Leon County, and City Public Works schedules and on historical cost experience. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $2,171,925

Sewer System Infrastructure Expansions & Upgrades
This project will fund minor sewer infrastructure expansions associated with land development activities. It involves refunds to developers for on-site and off-site activities including pipeline additions/adjustments as well as construction and/or modifications to pump station. This is a master-recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,040,000

Short Street Stormwater Improvements
Short Street and Alachua Avenue periodically flood; and several residential properties are known to have yard, garage and basem*nt flooding. The storm drain system serving this area is at the end of its design life, and in need of repair and/or replacement.

Future Funding

Sidewalk - Polk Drive
In December 2010, the Tallahassee City Commission approved staff’s recommendation to combine all planned pedestrian and bicycle project lists into a single consolidated list entitled the Planned Multimodal Project (PMP) list. Using the prioritization criteria, with safety serving as the number one priority, and evolving Commission priorities, three major sidewalk projects will begin this fiscal year on Putnam Rd., Polk Rd., and Shamrock Rd. These projects range from one to two years of construction.

FY2017 Budget: $200,000

Sidewalk - Putnam Drive
In December 2010, the Tallahassee City Commission approved staff’s recommendation to combine all planned pedestrian and bicycle project lists into a single consolidated list entitled the Planned Multimodal Project (PMP) list. Using the prioritization criteria, with safety serving as the number one priority, and evolving Commission priorities, three major sidewalk projects will begin this fiscal year on Putnam Rd., Polk Rd., and Shamrock Rd. These projects range from one to two years of construction.

FY2017 Budget: $535,000

Sidewalk - Shamrock Street
In December 2010, the Tallahassee City Commission approved staff’s recommendation to combine all planned pedestrian and bicycle project lists into a single consolidated list entitled the Planned Multimodal Project (PMP) list. Using the prioritization criteria, with safety serving as the number one priority, and evolving Commission priorities, three major sidewalk projects will begin this fiscal year on Putnam Rd., Polk Rd., and Shamrock Rd. These projects range from one to two years of construction.

FY2017 Budget: $1,400,000

Skyland Drive Outfall Ditch Improvement
Over the years, erosion has enlarged the ditch to a point that encroachment into the adjacent residential properties has had to be addressed in the past and continues to approach other properties. This ditch runs behind houses on both Skyland Drive and Devra Drive. The ditch is in a 20-foot wide right-of-way and is 8 feet deep with nearly vertical side slopes. The ditch is 800 feet in length and affects 14 residential properties. The only access to this ditch is at the north end requiring the drainage weed and brush crews to mow the ditch by hand utilizing weed eaters. Any stabilization maintenance required (placement of sandbags, installation of rip rap, etc.) must also be done by hand, utilizing wheelbarrows and the inmate crew. Preliminary design would install a 48-inch RCP with five structures. The estimated cost, including the design fees, is $183,000. We are requesting the design and construction funding all within the same year as this relatively small project can be designed and constructed within one fiscal year. This project's cost estimate was made according to staff's knowledge of the cost of similarly sized projects.

FY2017 Budget: $50,000

Small Projects Initiative
Drainage Basin: City Wide. This project provides funding for smaller stormwater problems to be addressed in a timely manner. To address this issue, a staff person has been assigned to work only on small projects. Projected costs are engineer’s estimates, based upon Water Resources Engineering historical property acquisition, engineering design, and project construction costs.

FY2017 Budget: $350,000

South City - Country Club Creek Stormwater Improvements
The project objective is to improve the stormwater infrastructure and level of service, specifically along Country Club Creek, in South City. The project will evaluate options to clean and address the severe erosion along segments of the Country Club Creek watercourse; thereby, reducing sediment transport downstream to Silver Lake and Lake Munson. The project will also evaluate, and if necessary upgrade, cross-drain culverts along the creek. The project may include the acquisition of abandoned, flood prone residential properties. A re-mapping of the FEMA Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) of the East Ditch and Country Club Creek will be provided if warranted by engineering analysis. Projected costs are engineer’s estimates, based upon historical property acquisition, engineering design and construction costs.

Future Funding

Storm Drain System Inspection/Rehabilitation/Replacement
This a master project that provides funding to inspect, and if necessary, repair or replace storm drain pipes and structures within City streets that are scheduled for resurfacing. Storm drain infrastructure has a service life which can be extended through timely inspection and rehabilitation. When rehabilitation is not feasible, replacement should be performed prior to street resurfacing. This storm drain RR&I work will also be coordinated with other City utility RR&I projects along streets that are not currently programmed in the City's resurfacing program. Additionally, the City's NPDES MS4 Permit requires annual inspection and maintenance of a minimum of 62 of the drainage infrastructure. This project will assist the City in achieving compliance with this component of the MS4 permit. Periodically, funds may be utilized to purchase, upgrade, and/or replace inspection equipment..

FY2017 Budget: $750,000

Stormwater Management Office Upgrades
This project will provide funding for miscellaneous repairs and capital improvements for the Stormwater Management office quarters in the Gemini Building. This work will include limited demolition and construction, including mechanical and plumbing retrofits, painting, carpet replacement, and furniture replacement.

FY2017 Budget: $613,400

Stormwater Pollution Reduction
The initial assessment and planning phase has been completed. However, the SPRP has transitioned into the implementation element of the program. The Division will continue to fund prioritization, feasibility studies and BMP monitoring via this project.

Future Funding

Street Resurfacing Program
"The purpose of this program is to resurface those City-owned paved streets that have been deemed, through the pavement management assessment process, to be in need of this action. The primary method used for this program is the conventional asphalt overlay. Cold milling of the existing surface is sometimes required. The recycled milled asphalt is a “green” method in that the milled material is re-used for based material. Another method we utilize is ""hot in place"" which also reuses the existing top surface which is a ""green"" process that further supports the City's recycling efforts. The work is performed by contractors that have been selected through the competitive bid process. City staff inspects the contractor’s work.

FY2017 Budget: $3,571,200

Thermo-plastic Marking Program
Thermo-plastic pavement markings, as opposed to painted markings, are a much more durable method for marking the city’s roadways. The life expectancy for thermo-plastic markings is six to ten years depending upon the roadways’ usage. The life expectancy for painted markings is six months to a year. However, with current work load, budget and staff, we are unable to complete even one cycle per year. Additionally, the thermo-plastic markings, because they incorporate glass beads in the fluid as it is applied, provides better initial reflectivity and better retains that reflectivity over the life of the application. This improves motorist safety. Using skip dash white striping as the baseline, the estimated contractual unit cost for thermo-plastic marking is $1,000 per mile. The estimated cost for painted markings is $190 per mile. If you assume that the paint cycle is completed every 9 months and compare it with thermo-plastic for an average 8 year cycle, the cost is $2,025/mile vs. $1,000/mile. Of course, there are other costs such as stop bars, crosswalks, solid white turn lanes, etc. The average unit cost for paint is approximately 2 times as much than thermo-plastic for the 8 year cycle.

For the past approximate 9 years, Public Works Operations has been applying thermo-plastic pavement markings as part of the resurfacing program. This decreases funds available for asphalt resurfacing. Because of this, this capital request is being made to develop a program designed to progressively apply and maintain thermo-plastic pavement markings to the streets of Tallahassee that previously have had painted markings.

FY2017 Budget: $40,000

Timberlane School Sidewalk
This project involves the construction of sidewalks on one side of the road on a portion of Timberlane School Road which lies within the City limits.

Future Funding

Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Compliance
The Federal Clean Water Act requires that states identify impaired waters and that they develop programs to reduce pollutant loads in those waters. Nationwide, the programs being developed to address these requirements are called total maximum daily load (TMDL). Florida is moving forward with its TMDL program very rapidly in response to a court ordered schedule. This program could have significant financial impacts on the city. This project provides funding for engineering and administrative activities to develop strategies to address the regulatory requirements of the TMDL program, and to ensure that city interests are protected. Primary activities under this project would include developing necessary technical data and receiving water computer models, negotiating with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), preparing TMDL implementation plans, and developing other programmatic elements.

Future Funding

Wastewater Collection Recurring Work Orders
Each fiscal year the distribution and collection division performs a series of capital projects that cover wastewater collection system activities listed below. This is a master recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $2,793,500

Wastewater Treatment Improvements
Each fiscal year, the Wastewater Treatment Division performs various capital projects relating to the repair, replacement, and maintenance activities at the various treatment facilities. Project activities are listed below. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to fiscal year end will be returned to fund balance.

Future Funding

FY2017 Budget: $850,000

Water and Sewer Engineering Office Upgrades
This project will provide funding for miscellaneous upgrades and capital improvements for the Water and Sewer Engineering office quarters in the Gemini Building. This work will include limited demolition and construction, including mechanical and plumbing retrofits, painting, carpet replacement, and furniture replacement.

FY2017 Budget: $536,600

Water Distribution Recurring Work Orders
Each fiscal year, the Distribution and Collection Division performs a series of capital projects, which cover water distribution system activities shown below. Fire hydrant maintenance is included in the Fire Department's CIP. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,130,500

Water Distribution System Extensions and Upgrades
In FY2016 and prior years, this project was named Water Minor Line Extensions and Upgrades. The name is being changed to more accurately reflect the purpose of this project. This project will fund water distribution system extensions as well as development related reimbursem*nts. It will also fund water main replacements and upgrades identified by maintenance and operating activities. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,105,000

Water Line Reloc./Adj. for FDOT/City/Leon County P/W
This project funds the relocation and adjustment of water distribution infrastructure that conflicts with proposed roadway improvements planned by City and County Public Works Departments, Blue Print 2000 and the Florida Department of Transportation. The scope and cost of these relocations/adjustments vary with each project and cannot be accurately determined until final construction plans are available. The projected five-year funding levels are based on preliminary FDOT, Leon County, Blue Print 2000 and City Public Works schedules and on historical cost experience. An engineering firm or water utility engineering staff will design and inspect each of these projects as needed. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended prior to the end of the fiscal year will be returned to fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $1,155,000

Water Quality Bldg Relocation
This project provides for the design and construction of a new building, or an expanded, renovated facility, for the Water Quality building at the Thomas P. Smith Reclamation Facility. The original building was constructed in the mid-1970s and has had 3 major additions. The additions failed to address laboratory ventilation and air quality allowing lab fumes to travel to office and public areas. Previous addition did not address aging electrical systems, handicap accessibility, and safe work conditions. Some of the laboratory work benches are in poor condition and need to be replaced.

The laboratory is accredited through the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program and provides valuable process data for the wastewater, drinking water and storm water systems. Having the laboratory part of Underground Utilities allows immediate service during critical investigations and special sampling events. The laboratory plays an essential role in meeting the City’s GreenPrint Initiatives Object NR1: Protect the groundwater resources of the City of Tallahassee by analyzing drinking water, wastewater, and storm water samples to better understand potential contaminates to our aquifer.

The original building was constructed in the mid-1970s and has had 3 major additions. Several components of the electrical and HVAC systems need to be replaced and many areas of the building need to be brought up to code.

The decision to construct a new building in a different location on the TPS site or to expand and renovate the existing facility will be decided after architectural evaluations are complete. A facility needs assessment has been completed and preliminary designs with cost estimates are expected to be completed.

The Water Quality laboratory provides analytical services to both the Water Utility and external customers, generating revenue. A more efficient laboratory will maximize revenue.

FY2017 Budget: $3,9500,000

Water Well and Elevated Tank Renovation & Replacement
This project supports improvements, upgrades, and emergency repairs at the various city water wells and elevated tanks. Currently, there are 27 water wells and 8 elevated water storage tanks in the city's water supply system. Rule 62-555.360 (operation and maintenance of public water systems) by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection requires that drinking-water storage tanks be inspected annually and cleaned at least once every five years to remove bio growths, calcium or iron/manganese deposits, and other debris from inside the tanks. The rule also requires inspection for structural and coating integrity at least once every five years by personnel under the responsible charge of a professional engineer licensed in Florida. The tanks also require annual cathodic protection inspection to help prevent corrosion.

FY2017 Budget: $795,000

Water Well Facilities Improvements
This project includes structural analysis of existing water well facilities and provides for repair and maintenance of the buildings that house chemicals, electrical motors and electrical control centers. The project also supports improvements and upgrades to the SCADA remote monitoring and control systems, Motor Control Centers (MCC), backup power generators and auxiliary engines at various city water wells. This project will also be used to fund future needs to clean and paint the systems elevated water tanks. The new control centers will allow better compatibility with today's technology to monitor additional safety and security equipment, to be compatible with newer software versions and to enhance remote monitoring and operations. Tank 1 is scheduled to be painted in FY18. Additional well/tank improvements are also anticipated.

FY2017 Budget: $400,000

Weems Road Extension
This project provides for the extension of Weems Road from Mahan Drive, northerly and westerly, to tie to a new section of Automotive Way built as part of the Mahan Villages Shopping Center.

FY2017 Budget: $773,000

Weems Road Pass
This project provides for the reconstruction Weems Road between Mahan Drive and Easterwood Drive as an urban street with curb and gutter, sidewalks and sharrow lanes to meet City standards for pedestrian and street safety (PASS). There will be a trail constructed along the east side of the roadway connecting the Goose pond trail to Mahan Drive. The construction of Phase 1 (Capital Circle N.E. to Railroad crossing) is complete. Design of Phase 2 (Railroad crossing to Mahan Drive) is underway. The project also includes improvements to the existing Weems Pond outfall and roadway crossing to address recurring flooding of the roadway.

Future Funding

Welaunee Plantation - Gas Main Extension
This project involves the design and construction of natural gas mains to provide service to Welaunee Plantation. This is a recurring project. Annual appropriations that are not expended at the end of the fiscal year will be returned to the fund balance.

FY2017 Budget: $142,300

Well 23 Treatment Construction
The northwest water distribution area is served by two water supply wells, one of which (Well 23) is out of service pending the addition of a treatment system. This project will fund the design and construction of a treatment facility to improve the aesthetics and quality of the water supplied by this well. This is a specific project which will require appropriations in multiple years. This funding is required to perform the rehabilitation efforts.

Future Funding

Zillah Street PASS (Roadway)
This project will improve pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular roadside safety along the Zillah Street corridor from Tram Road to Paul Russell Road. Currently the roadway has deep open ditches immediately adjacent to the travel lanes along the southern half of the roadway and shallower swales along the northern portion of the roadway. There is a sidewalk along the west side of the roadway throughout the project limits and a multi-use trail on the west side along the north half of the roadway. The project will consist of adding curb and gutter, closing the roadside ditches, installing stormwater inlets and conveyance, constructing a sidewalk along the east side of the roadway and bicycle lanes from Tram Road to Omega Avenue. There is a multi-use trail along Zillah Street from Omega Avenue to Paul Russell Road so bicycle lanes will not be constructed along this portion of the roadway.

Future Funding

4.3 Five Year Capital Improvement Plan Budget

View Five Year Capital Improvement Plan Budget

4.4 Schedule of Debt Service

View the FY17 Debt Service

4.5 FY17 Debt Policy Analysis

View the FY17 Debt Policy Analysis

4.6 Browse FY17 Capital Projects

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5.0 FINANCIAL SCHEDULES

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The City of Tallahassee (11)

The City regulates the planning, management, and financing of general government and enterprise operations through established policy standards. These policies define the appropriate use of year-end surpluses, transfers to general government operations, and establish operating reserves for select funds. Additional reserves such as the deficiencies, fleet, and RR&I reserves are also governed by the City’s finance policies.


  • 5.1 FY17 Schedule of All Fund Balance
  • 5.2 FY17 Summary of Revenue Expenditures by Fund
  • 5.3 FY17 Schedule of Fund Structure
  • 5.4 Five Year Fund Proformas

5.5 View the Entire FY17 Approved Budget on OpenGov

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6.0 APPENDIX

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Contributing Staff
Raoul Lavin-Assistant City Manager, Administrative and Professional Services
Robert Wigen-Director, Financial Management
Amy McLean-Senior Management Analyst
Matt Matherne-Senior Management Analyst
Chandra Peterson-Management Analyst
Eugene Sherman-Management Analyst
Kristen Kerr-Management Analyst
Max Stout-Policy Analyst
Sarah Roberts-Management Analyst
Taiishina Olds McQueen-Management Analyst
Omar Floyd-Administrative Specialist
Kristie Mill-IT Support
Ana Guerra-Intern

The City of Tallahassee was awarded the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) for the fiscal year 2016 budget. This is the 30th year the City of Tallahassee has received this award. The continued recognition is due to the strong leadership of current and prior City Commissions ensuring that the City’s budget is transparent, understandable and accessible to our citizens. This recognition also validates observations from the recent peer review of our budget process and document that indicated that the City of Tallahassee is ahead of other municipalities in our transparency and communication efforts.

FY16 GFOA Budget Award

Download the complete appendix.

6.1 Definitions

ACCRUAL BASIS - A basis of accounting in which transactions are recognized at the time they are incurred, as opposed to when cash is received or spent.

AD VALOREM TAXES - Taxes levied on both real and personal property according to the property's valuation and the tax rate.

ADVERTISING - Costs for legal advertisem*nts, posters, publication of public notices, resolutions, ordinances, and bid invitations.

APPROPRIATION - A legal authorization to incur obligations and to make expenditures for specific purposes.

AVAILABLE (UNDESIGNATED) FUND BALANCE -This refers to the funds remaining from the prior year which are available for appropriation and expenditure in the current year.

BAD DEBT - The estimated amount of accounts owed to the city (receivables) that will not be collected during the year. This includes utility accounts, accident damage repair accounts, and other miscellaneous account receivables which are deemed uncollectible.

BALANCED BUDGET- The revenues must equal the expenditures. Florida Statute 166 reads, “The amount available from taxation and other sources, including balances brought forward from prior fiscal years, must equal the total appropriations for expenditures and reserves."

BOND - Evidence of the local government's obligation to repay a specified principal amount on a future maturity date, plus interest. Bonds are issued to obtain money for capital projects. Revenue bonds pledge a particular source of revenue usually generated by the new asset as the means of repayment.

BOND REFERENDUM - The process by which voters approve or disapprove a proposed general obligation bond issue.

BOND REFINANCING - The payoff and re-issuance of bonds to obtain better interest rates and/or bond conditions.

BOND RESOLUTION - The document by which the local government authorizes the sale of bonds.

BUDGET - The formal allocation of resources (dollars) to various programs with the intent of performing a service.

BUDGETARY BASIS - The basis of accounting used to estimate financing sources and uses in the budget. This generally takes one of three forms: GAAP, cash, or modified accrual.

BUDGET CALENDAR - The schedule of key dates that the city follows in the preparation and adoption of the budget.

CAPITAL ASSETS - Assets of significant value and having a useful life of several years. Capital assets are also called fixed assets.

CAPITAL BUDGET - The appropriation of bonds or operating revenue for improvements to facilities and other infrastructure.

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS (Capital Projects) - Expenditures related to the acquisition, expansion, or rehabilitation of an element of the government's physical plant; sometimes referred to as infrastructure.

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN (CIP) - A plan forcapital outlay to be incurred each year over a fixed number of years to meet capital needs arising from the government's long-term needs.

CAPITAL OUTLAY - Fixed assets which have a value of $750 or more and have a useful economic lifetime of more than one year or assets of any value if the nature of the item is such that it must be controlled for custody purposes as a fixed asset.

CAPITALIZED OVERHEAD - Charges assessed to capital projects for administrative and labor related services.

CAPITALIZED WAGES – Direct salaries or wages of city employees which are paid from funding appropriated in the capital budget.

CASH BASIS - A basis of accounting in which transactions are recognized only when cash is increased or decreased.

CITY CONTINGENCY - Amount budgeted to meet unexpected operating expenditures that occur during the current year.

COST OF GOODS SOLD (COGS) FUEL STORES -Fuel purchased by the city garage and then resold by the city for use in the city fleet.

COST OF GOODS SOLD (COGS) MATERIALSSTORES - The cost of materials and supplies which are resold by the city. This includes articles for resale by the city garage parts division, the city warehouse, and golf courses.

COST OF GOODS SOLD (COGS) NATURAL GAS -This account represents the cost of natural gas purchased by the city electric department for use to generate electricity and natural gas sold by the gas utility department to gas customers.

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENT - A legalcontract between the city and representatives of a recognized bargaining unit for specific terms and conditions of employment (e.g., hours, working conditions, salary, fringe benefits, and matters affecting health and safety of employees).

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (CPI) - A statistical description of price levels provided by the U.S. Department of Labor. The index is used as a measure of the increase in the cost of living (i.e., economic inflation).

CONTRACTUAL SERVICES - Services rendered to the city by private firms, individuals, or other governmental agencies. Examples include maintenance agreements and professional consulting services.

CURRENT SERVICE LEVEL (CSL) - A level of service which is the same as the current year.

DEBT SERVICE - The amount of money needed to 1) pay interest on outstanding bonds, 2) pay the principal on maturing bonds, and 3) make contributions to a sinking fund for term bonds, debt service is calculated on a fiscal year basis.

DEDICATED TAX - A tax levied to support a specific government program or purpose.

DEFICIT - The excess of an entity's liabilities over its assets or the excess of expenditures or expenses over revenues during a single accounting period.

DEPARTMENT - Organizational unit of government, which is functionally unique in its delivery of services.

DEPRECIATION - Expiration in the service life of capital assets attributable to wear and tear, deterioration, action of the physical elements, inadequacy, or obsolescence.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS - Costs incurred by the city for pension, health insurance, and other benefits provided to employees.

ENCUMBRANCE - The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase an item or service. To encumber funds means to set aside or commit funds for a specified future expenditure.ENTERPRISE FUND - A fund established for services that are predominantly self-supported by user fees and charges.

EQUIPMENT SUPPLIES - The cost of materials and supplies used in conjunction with the operation of machinery and equipment.

EXPENDITURE - The payment of cash or the transfer of property or services for the purpose of acquiring goods and/or services or settling a loss.

EXPENSE - Charges incurred (whether paid immediately or to be paid at a later date) for operations, maintenance, interest, or other charges.

FISCAL YEAR - A twelve-month period designated as the operating year for accounting and budgeting purposes in an organization. The fiscal year for the City of Tallahassee is October 1 through September 30.

FULL TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) - A method ofmeasuring the number of authorized employees based on a full-time equivalent of 2,080 hours per year.

FUND - A fiscal/accounting entity that is established to accomplish specific objectives and carry out specific activities. Examples: debt service fund, capital projects fund, and special assessment fund.

FUND BALANCE - The excess of the assets of a fund over its liabilities, reserves, and carryover.

GENERAL GOVERNMENT CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTFUND (GG/CIF) – Undesignated capital funding that serves as a contingency for all capital funding sources in the general government.

GENERAL GOVERNMENT CAPITAL PROJECTACCOUNT (GG/CPA) – Funding provided from the general fund operating budget to support general government capital projects.

GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTINGPRINCIPLES (GAAP) - Uniform minimum standards for financial accounting and recording, encompassing the conventions, rules, and procedures that define accepted accounting principles.

GENERAL FUND - The fund used to finance all non- enterprise operations of local government.

GOAL - A statement of broad direction, purpose, or intent based on the needs of the community. A goal is general and timeless.Glossary of Key Terms

GRANT - A contribution by a government or other organization to support a particular function. Grants may be classified as either operational or capital, depending upon the intended usage of the grant proceeds.

INCREASED SERVICE LEVEL (ISL) - A change inservice delivery which exceeds the current level of service.

INDIRECT COST - A cost necessary for the functioning of the organization as a whole that cannot be directly assigned to one service.

INFRASTRUCTURE - The physical assets of a government (e.g., streets, water works, sewer lines, public buildings, and parks).

IN LIEU OF TAXES - Income received by local governments to compensate for the loss of revenue from tax-exempt property.

INSURANCE - Costs associated with workers’ compensation claims including administration and medical costs, dishonesty bonds, and property and casualty insurance premiums.

INTER-FUND TRANSFER - Legally authorized transfers from a fund receiving revenue to a fund through which resources are to be expended.

INTEREST EXPENSE - Cost of utilizing borrowed funds (long-term debt).

INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE OR SHAREDREVENUE - Tax/fee money collected by one level of government and distributed to another level of government.

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS - Funds established to distribute costs to user departments for administrative services provided by another unit of government, such as data processing or insurance funded from a central pool.

INTRA-FUND TRANSFER - Legally authorized transfers within a fund.

LEVY - To impose taxes for the support of government activities.

LONG-TERM DEBT - Debt with a maturity of more than one year after the date of issuance.

MILLAGE RATE - The rate in mills (1 mill = 1/1000 of a dollar or .001) at which property is taxed.MISSION - A description of the purpose, values, strategies, and behavior standards that guide an organization and move it toward its vision. A mission states what the organization is, what it does, for whom, and why.

OBJECTIVE - A specific/quantifiable statement of what the city, a department, or a unit expects to accomplish in a fiscal year.

OFFICE EQUIPMENT - Furniture, fixtures and equipment with an initial cost of $750 or more.

OPERATING REVENUE - Funds received by the city as income to pay for on-going operations, including taxes, fees, interest earnings, and grant revenues.

OPERATING EXPENSES - The cost for personnel, materials, and equipment required for a department to function.

ORDINANCE - Legislation enacted by the City Commission which has the full force and effect of law within the municipal boundaries.

OTHER SALARY ADJUSTMENTS - Items of employee compensation that are not directly related to the regular or overtime hours worked.

OVERTIME - Compensation to eligible employees for hours worked beyond 40 hours within a specific workweek.

PAY-AS-YOU-GO BASIS - A term used to describe a financial policy by which capital projects (infrastructure) are financed from current revenues rather than through borrowing.

PENSION CURRENT - City contribution to employee pension plan for participating employees.

PENSION MATCHED ANNUITY PENSION PLAN(MAPP) - City contribution to employee matchedannuity pension plan for participating employees.

PER CAPITA COST - Cost per unit of population to provide a particular service in the community.

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS - Specific quantitative and qualitative measures of work planned by specific departments or programs.

PERFORMANCE MEASURE - Data collected to determine how effective or efficient a program is in achieving its objectives (performance indicators).

PRIOR-YEAR ENCUMBRANCES - Unpaid, legally binding obligations from previous fiscal years in the form of purchase orders, contracts, or salary commitments, which are chargeable to a prior appropriation and for which a part of that appropriation is reserved.

PROGRAM - A collection of activities directed at accomplishing similar objectives.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE BUDGET - A method ofbudgeting whereby the services provided to the residents are broken down in identifiable service or performance units and funding is appropriated for a given level of service or units.

PROPERTY TAX - An ad valorem tax based on the fair market value of real property (land and buildings) and personal property (business equipment). Fair market or "just" value is determined by the county property appraiser as of January 1 of each year, under the guidelines of Chapter 193, Florida Statutes.

REDUCED SERVICE LEVEL (RSL) - A level ofprogram service which is less than that of the current year.

REPAIRS, REPLACEMENTS & IMPROVEMENTS(RR&I) - The portion of the cost of fixed assets (excluding land) charged as an expense during a particular period due to expiration in service life, attributable to wear and tear through use and lapse of time, obsolescence, inadequacy, or other physical or functional cause.

RESERVE - An account used either to set aside budgeted revenues that are not required for expenditure in the current budget year or to earmark revenues for a specific future purpose.

RESERVE TRANSFER - Those payments necessary to adequately meet the current requirements for reserve funds.

RESOLUTION - A special or temporary order of a legislative body that requires less legal formality than an ordinance or statute.

REVENUE - Money that flows into the local government. It is recurring if it is received on a consistent basis (e.g., sales taxes and property taxes) and nonrecurring if it is received irregularly (e.g., federal and state grants). The four main types of local revenue are taxes, user fees, licenses and permits, and intergovernmental revenue.ROLLED-BACK MILLAGE RATE - A tax rate, which applied to the current year’s tax base, will bring in the same amount of taxes as levied the prior year. Newly constructed property or other property added to or deleted from the prior year‘s base is excluded.

SALARIES AND WAGES - Regular weekly and monthly compensation for work performed as defined by the personnel pay scale for position classifications.

SERVICE LEVEL - Services or products which comprise actual or expected output of a given program.

SOCIAL SECURITY - City contribution to employee Social Security for participating employees.

SPECIAL ASSESSMENT - A tax on property owners who receive a benefit not received by all other taxpayers.

SPECIAL REVENUE FUND- Special revenue funds are used to account for and report the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are restricted or committed to expenditure for specified purposes other than debt service or capital projects.

SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION - An additionalappropriation made by the governing body after the budget year has started.

TAX BASE - The total taxable value of property within the local government's legal boundaries.

TAX ROLL - The master list of the assessed value of all taxable property within the government's jurisdiction. The list is certified to all local taxing authorities by the property appraiser by July 1 of each year.

TAXABLE VALUE - The assessed value of property less exemptions.

TAXES - Compulsory charges levied by a government for the purpose of financing services for the common benefit of the people.

TEMPORARY WAGES - Seasonal or temporary employees' compensation computed on hourly or monthly rates.

TERM BONDS - Bonds comprising a large part or all of a particular bond issue which come due in a single maturity.

TRAVEL AND TRAINING - The cost of attending meetings, conferences, short conferences, etc.

TRUST FUND - A fund established to collect and distribute monies for a specific function or operation.

UNCLASSIFIED EQUIPMENT - New equipment not otherwise classified, including air conditioners, traffic signals, field stripers, water fountains, etc. This includes all tangible personal property to be purchased which has a value of $1,000 or more. This equipment, as with all capital equipment, is subject to inventory control.

UNCLASSIFIED PROFESSIONAL FEES - The cost ofpersonnel service under expressed or implied contracts to individuals, companies, or corporations engaged as a contractor to perform a specific professional or expert service for the city.

UNCLASSIFIED SUPPLIES - Consumable materials and supplies used in conjunction with projects or operations not specifically classified.

6.2 Commonly Used Abbreviations

AHAP Affordable Housing Assistance Program
CAD Computer Aided Dispatch
CDA Consolidated Dispatch Agency
CDBG Community Development Block Grant
CHSP Community Human Service Partnership
CIP Capital Improvement Plan
CIS Customer Information System
COCA Council on Culture and Arts
COPS Community-Oriented Policing Services
GG/CPA General Government/Capital Projects Account
GIS Geographic Information Systems
HOMEHome Investment Partnership Program
HUD Housing and Urban Development
IAFF International Association of Firefighters
IRP Integrated Resource Planning
ISO Insurance Service Office
ISS Information Systems Services
JARC Juvenile Assessment Receiving Center
CPI Consumer Price Index
KWH Kilowatt Hour
CRA Community Redevelopment Agency
CUSBConsolidated Utility System Bond
DEP Department of Environmental Protection
DIA Downtown Improvement Authority
DRI Development of Regional Impact
EAP Employee Assistance Program
EEO Equal Employment Opportunity
EOC Emergency Operations Center
ERU Equivalent Residential Unit
EWD Equity and Workforce Development
FAA Federal Aviation Authority
FAMU Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
FDOT Florida Department of Transportation
FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency
FERC Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
FDEP Florida Department of Environmental Protection
FHWA Federal Highway Administration
FSU Florida State University
FTA Federal Transportation Administration
FTE Full-time Equivalent
GASB Governmental Accounting Standards Board
GF General Fund
GG/CIF General Government/Capital Improvement Fund
LLEB Local Law Enforcement Block Grant
MAPP Matched Annuity Pension Plan
MBE Minority Business Enterprise
MGD Million Gallons Daily
MSA Metropolitan Statistical Area
MW Megawatt
NPDES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System
PASS Pedestrian and Street Safety
PBA Police Benevolent Association
PETS Permit Enforcement Tracking System
PSC Public Service Commission
PUD Planned Unit Development
RFP Request for Proposal
RR&I Repairs, Replacements, and Improvements
SCADA System Control and Data Acquisition
SHIP State Housing Initiative Plan
SPRP Stormwater Pollution Reduction Program
TCC Tallahassee Community College
TDP Transit Development Plan
TFD Tallahassee Fire Department
TMDL Total Maximum Daily Load
TPD Tallahassee Police Department
TSA Transportation Safety Administration

6.3 Capital Funding Source Descriptions

Funding Source Abbreviation Category Description
General Gov. Capital Improvement Fund GGCIF General Government Cash funding available from the undesignated balances in the capital project account. Funding is from closed projects, unprogrammed funding from the GG/CPA transfer and interest earnings. GGCIF funding can be utilized for any type of general government (General Fund departments, StarMetro, Golf Courses, etc.) projects.
General Gov. Capital Project Account GGCPA General Government Cash funding received from the operating budget to support general government projects. Funding from this source can be utilized for any general government capital project.
Golf Course RR&I Golf RR&I Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Funding received from the golf course operating budget that is designated for capital improvements at the Hilaman golf course. Revenues received from the capital improvement surcharge at the golf course are included in this fund. No projects are programmed from this source in the 2016-2020 CIP.
Information Systems Services RR&I ISS RR&I Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Cash funding received from the Information Systems Services operating budget that is designated for technology infrastructure capital.
Information Systems Services RR&I Undesignated Balance ISS RR&I/UB Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Undesignated/unprogrammed funding from the ISS RR&I funding source. No projects are programmed from this source in the 2016-2020 CIP.
Intergovernmental-Leon County Intergovernmental- Leon County Special Funds Funding received from Leon County that is designated for specific capital improvement. No projects are programmed from this source in the 2016-2020 CIP.
Internal Loan Internal Loan Special Funds Funding from the city's Internal Loan Pool. These are short term loans issued by the city through Sunshine State. Funding from the internal loan pool can be utilized to fund capital projects in all areas. The city's Treasurer-Clerk's Office administers the internal loan program.
Passenger Facility Charge PFC Special Funds Funding received from the Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) charged on all passengers using the city's airport. A charge of up to $4.50 per passenger for each enplanement can be charged in accordance with Federal Regulations. Funding from this source can be utilized for those projects that qualify for FAA funding. This funding also can be used to fund projects by themselves or as a local match for FAA and/or FDOT funded Aviation Department projects.
Private Investment Private Investment Special Funds Funds received from private investors as contributions to the cost of the project.
Revenue Collection Revenue Collection Fund General Government Funding transferred from the Revenue Collection internal service fund to support capital projects within the Revenue Fund.
Sales Tax 1989 Sales Tax 1989 General Government Funding generated from the one-cent sales tax approved by the voters in 1989 for a period of 15 years. Funding from the sales tax can be utilized for roadway and transportation projects as well as public safety facilities. The Public Works Department takes an agenda item for public hearing to use these proceeds for projects that had not been previously included on the approved sales tax project list. No projects are programmed from this source in the 2016-2020 CIP.
Sales Tax 2005 Sales Tax 2005 General Government Funding generated from extension of the one-cent sales tax approved by voters in 2000 for a period of 15 years. Funding from the sales tax can be utilized for those projects as identified in the BP 2000 plan, as well as those listed on the City Commission approved list of projects.
Sales Tax 2020 Sales Tax 2020 General Government Funding expected to be generated from extension of the 2005 one-cent sales tax upon its expiration on December 31, 2019. The extended tax, which will become effective January 1, 2020, was approved by voters in November 2014 for a period of 20 years.
Sewer System Charge Sewer System Charge Special Funds Revenues collected in the sewer system fund to provide for the capital cost of construction and directly-related costs required solely due to growth of the system.
Sewer Future CUSB Sewer Future CUSB Bond Proceeds Bond funding for the Sewer Utility to be issued as part of a future Consolidated Utility Systems Revenue Bonds issuance. The bonds are payable solely from and secured by a lien upon and pledge of the net revenues of the Utility System, which includes the Water and Sewer utilities. Funding from this source can only be utilized for Sewer Utility capital projects.
Sewer RR&I Sewer RR&I Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Cash funding received from the Water Utilities - Sewer operating budget that is dedicated for capital improvements for the sewer utility. This funding can only be utilized for Water Utilities - Sewer capital projects.
Sewer RR&I Undesignated Balance Sewer RR&I/UB Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Undesignated cash funding from prior year's Sewer RR&I funding. Funding is accumulated through balances in closed projects, unprogrammed RR&I funding and interest earnings. This funding can only be utilized for Sewer Utility capital projects.
Solid Waste Rate Stabilization Solid Waste Rate Stabilization Special Funds Cash funding received from the Solid Waste operating fund. This funding can only be used for Solid Waste activities.
Stormwater RR&I Stormwater RR&I Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Cash funding received from the Stormwater Utility operating budget that is dedicated for stormwater capital improvements. This funding can only be utilized for stormwater utility capital projects.
Stormwater RR&I Undesignated Balance Stormwater Utility Fee Special Funds Undesignatedcashfundingfromprioryear's Stormwater RR&I funding. Funding is accumulated through balances in closed projects, unprogrammed RR&I funding and interest earnings. This funding can only be utilized for Stormwater Utility capital projects.
Water System Charge Water System Charge Special Funds Revenues collected in the water system fund to provide for the capital cost of construction and directly-related costs required solely due to growth of the system.
Water Future CUSB Water Future CUSB Bond Proceeds Bond funding for the Water Utility to be issued as part of a future Consolidated Utility Systems Revenue Bonds issuance. The bonds are payable solely from and secured by a lien upon and pledge of the net revenues of the Utility System, which includes the Water and Sewer utilities. Funding from this source can only be utilized for Water Utility capital projects.
Water RR&I Water RR&I Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Cash funding received from the Water Utility operating budget that is dedicated for water utility capital improvements. This funding can only be utilized for Water Utility capital projects.
Water RR&I/Undesignated Balance Water RR&I/UB Renewal, Replacement & Improvement Funds (RR&I) Undesignated cash funding from prior years' Water RR&I funding. Funding is accumulated through balances in closed projects, unprogrammed RR&I funding and interest earnings. This funding can only be utilized for Water Utility capital projects.

6.4 Resolution

Resolution Budget
Resolution Millage

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